Friday, November 8, 2019 — 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM EST

Join us for our 4th Annual Grad Forum where our Public Issues Anthropology MA students present their research.

This event also includes a Meet & Greet with Grads and Professors.

Join us for refreshments and to learn more about our grad program and new topics!


Friday, November 8th, 2019

JEFFREY COFFIN - Identifying Mobility and Subsistence Patterns at the Site of Roquemissou

Jeffrey's thesis image

This project attempts to map the movement of Late Neolithic people who died and were buried at the site of Roquemissou in Southern France roughly 5000 years ago by comparing strontium isotope ratios within the dental enamel of 17 third molars from this burial with the varying ratios across the landscape. 



KATE ELLIOTT -  An Exploration into the Health of Women Experiencing Homelessness 

Kate Elliott's thesis image

This project has taken an intersectional approach in looking at the health of women experiencing homelessness, considering health as both a pathway into homelessness and a result of homelessness.

Using feminist methodology and qualitative methods, the research has identified the voices of those marginalised due to both their gender and their homeless status. In turn, this research has been able to identify what women experiencing homelessness actively prioritise with their health, explored their health-seeking behaviours, and considered how the population can be better supported.

 

ELIZABETH RAYNER - Corrections and Their Publics in Southern Ontario

Liz Rayner's thesis image

The correctional system does study how it may effectively process those under its stewardship. However, the focus is internal and generally ignores the situatedness of its locations.

She will talk about how NIMBY in this context is a symptom of a lack of engagement, whether or not this is an active strategy on the part of corrections.

 

BENJAMIN SCHER - Police Practices in Relation to Supervised Consumption Site Users in Vancouver: An Ethnographic Study

Ben Scher's thesis image

This past summer, he spent 4 months conducting ethnographic research at a supervised consumption site in the Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver. With this neighbourhood arguably at the epicentre of the current Canadian opioid crisis, the aim of this research was to analyse the relationship between local police and substance users with the aim of better understanding how current police practises impact the daily lived experiences of site users. 

Ultimately, he hopes that the findings of this research can aid policy makers in their pursuit for progressive, effective and evidence-based public policy. 

 

MARTHA TILDESLEY - Why Archaeology Matters – A Comparison of Archaeological Heritage Legislation from Around the World

Martha Tildesley's thesis image

The purpose of this study was to compare heritage legislation from different jurisdictions around the world that practice archaeology of both Indigenous populations and colonial settlers.

By comparing the different archaeological heritage legislation in Ontario, Nunavut, New Zealand and Tasmania, this study provides insights into practices from around the world in protecting archaeological heritage, and how laws protect archaeology and demonstrate why archaeology matters.

 

PANCHALA WEERASINGHE - Skeletons in Wells: Post-Mortem Treatments in Roman Eretria, Greece

Panchala's thesis image

During the field seasons of 2016 and 2017, the Swiss school of Archaeology in Greece discovered a large deposit of human bones from a third century CE Gymnasium well in Eretria.

The incomplete skeletons, the level of breakage and the sharp force trauma evident on adult and juvenile individuals that were deposited in the Eretrian gymnasium well suggest that these individuals entered the well as disarticulated skeletons. The reason for this ‘deviant’ burial treatment could have been the pathologies found on the skeletal remains.

 

CHIARA WILLIAMSON - Late Woodland Pottery Production in Essex County, Evidence from the Puce Site

Chiara Williamson's thesis image

During the Late Woodland Period, Essex County in Southwestern Ontario was home to a culturally distinctive Western Basin Tradition. This tradition has its own distinction that could be separated into 4 phases based on changes in pottery production, designs, and decorations.

This research focuses on an archaeological site, the Puce Site, excavated in Essex County that was occupied during this time period. Using a quantitative, attribute-based approach, 52 pottery pieces from the site were analysed.

Based on the results and compared to other nearby sites, this research discusses what was going on in terms of pottery production and settlement patterns at this particular point in time. 

 

This event is complimentary. All are welcome.

Parking available in lot M,N,J,W or X. Cost: $5.00

Any questions? or to RSVP. Contact Jennifer Doucet

Cost 
Free
Location 
DC - William G. Davis Computer Research Centre
Room 1301
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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