News for Media

Friday, March 6, 2020

Turning data into meaningful policy ideas: MPS Policy Datafest 2020

five-member Datafest grad student team smile in group pose

The Master of Public Service (MPS) program hosted the second annual Policy Datafest last week with more than 70 graduate students digging into public datasets to extract meaningful narratives and recommend policies for positive change.

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Anthropology research finds deforestation is changing animal communication

Howler Monkey in Costa Rican forest

Deforestation is changing the way monkeys communicate in their natural habitat, according to a new study led by Laura Bolt, an adjunct professor in the Department of Anthropology. The research offers the first evidence in animal communication scholarship of differences in vocal behaviours in response to different types of forest edge areas, particularly areas changed by human activity.

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Preserving Indigenous languages: Songs in the Key of Cree artists visit campus

Tomson Highway playing piano with Patricia Cano singing

Indigenous languages are critically endangered throughout the world. This is more than a loss of words: Indigenous languages embody sets of relationships and ways of being in the world that are powerful, transformative, and sometimes very funny. The Songs in the Key of Cree performance highlights the global importance of Indigenous languages.

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Marginalia scholarship leads to discovery of Milton's relationship to Shakespeare

detail of Milton's notes in Romeo and Juliet of the First Folio

Serendipity and scholarly expertise came together this fall to solve a puzzle about two giants of the English literary canon. “It’s like if you discovered that Milton was a woman – it would be unavoidable to address that in future studies,” says Katherine Acheson, a professor of English who edited Early Modern English Marginalia, the collection that led to the discovery of how Milton met Shakespeare.

Monday, October 7, 2019

Performance anticipation can weaken your memory

A person gives a presentation in a workplace meeting

Anticipating your own performance at work or school may hinder your ability to remember what happened before your presentation, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.

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