Talk with Dr. Aaron FensterExport this event to calendar

Wednesday, October 27, 2010 — 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM EDT

Guest Speaker:  Dr. Aaron Fenster
(Director and Scientist, Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON)
Title of Presentation:  "Use of 3D Ultrasound for diagnosis and treatment of human diseases"

[Host:  Dr. Qing-Bin Lu, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy]
Refreshments will be available!

Abstract:  The last two decades have witnessed unprecedented developments of new imaging systems making use of 3D visualization.  These new technologies have revolutionized diagnostic radiology, as they provide the clinician with information about the interior of the human body never before available. Ultrasound imaging is an important cost-effective technique used routinely in the management of a number of diseases.  However, 2D viewing of 3D anatomy, using conventional ultrasound, limits our ability to quantify and visualize the anatomy and guide therapy, because multiple 2D images must be integrated mentally.  This practice is inefficient, and leads to variability and incorrect diagnoses.  Also, since the 2D ultrasound image represents a thin plane at an arbitrary angle in the body, reproduction of this plane at a later time is difficult.

Over the past 2 decades, investigators have addressed these limitations by developing 3D ultrasound techniques.  In this paper we describe our developments of 3D ultrasound imaging instrumentation and techniques.  In our approach the conventional ultrasound transducer is scanned electronically, mechanically or using a free-hand technique.  The 2D images are digitized and then reconstructed in real-time into a 3D image, which can be viewed and manipulated interactively.  We describe the use of 3D ultrasound for diagnosis, image-guided therapy and use in basic biomedical research.  Examples will be given for imaging various organs, such as the prostate, carotid arteries, and breast, and for the use in 3D ultrasound-guided brachytherapy and cryosurgery. In addition, we describe 3D segmentation methods that can be used for quantitative analysis of disease progression and regression in humans as well as research animal models.

Location 
DC - William G. Davis Computer Research Centre
Room 1302
200 University Ave West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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