Waterloo Biologist’s landmarking study featured by Michigan State University

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Kim Cuddington.

In the past two centuries, invasive species have drastically changed the Great Lakes ecosystem.

A recent study by Kim Cuddington, a Professor in the Department of Biology, demonstrated how landmarking works and the key role it plays in population control.

She discovered that landmarking is a highly efficient mating strategy that allows species to reproduce even when population densities are impossibly low.

Cuddington spoke with Michigan State University’s Melissa Benmark about how monitoring the mating hangout of Asian Carp could be useful in keeping them from invading the Great Lakes.

Landmarking is really the human equivalent of going where everyone else is hanging out in order to find a mate,” says Cuddington. “A landmark can be almost anything depending on the species you’re talking about. It could be tufted grass if you’re small enough or for a fish species it could be a nice fast river that’s exiting into a lake.”

Listen to the full interview on Michigan State University’s website.

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