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In Brief reports highlight issues provinces can tackle for youth health

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Propel has released three provincial reports highlighting recent data for student tobacco, e-cigarette, alcohol and cannabis use. The In Brief reports for Ontario, Alberta and Prince Edward Island were created in response to requests from educators and policy makers to help guide provincial action on youth health. Data for the reports included the recently released 2014/2015 Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CSTADS; formerly the Youth Smoking Survey) data.

In Brief gives a snapshot of specific risk behaviours in youth, such as hookah use (for Alberta and Ontario), and tobacco, alcohol and drug use (in Prince Edward Island). The reports show trends for each province and provide valuable information to those advocating for change in provincial policy.

“The Prince Edward Island data point to the need for further action to stem this rise in tobacco product use,” said Steve Manske, Senior Scientist at Propel Centre for Population Health Impact.  “In addition to PEI students reporting significantly higher tobacco usage than the rest of Canada for six key indicators, more than 30% of student smokers report using menthol cigarettes in the last 30 days. Menthol and other youth-targeted flavouring entice students to start using tobacco products. Prince Edward Island can join in support for a renewed federal tobacco strategy, and set its own targets for reducing use.”

The reports are available online on Propel’s resources page.

Email Propel if you are interested in receiving a tailored report for your province.

CSTADS is a biennial school-based survey of Canadian students in grades 6-12. The Propel Centre for Population Health Impact at the University of Waterloo has led the implementation of CSTADS in Canada since 2004. Additional information about the survey can be found at cstads.ca.

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