Past Events

Recent Visitors

Since 2007, speakers of interest at the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience (CTN) have included:

Jay McLelland, Geoff Hinton, Tony Movshon, William Bechtel, Sue Becker, Frances Skinner, Paul Cisek, Eric Cook, Doug Crawford, Randy Flanagan, Andre Longtin, Mandar Jog, Jean Rouat, Maneesh Sahani, David Terman, Andrea Stocco, Michael Frank, Yann LeCun, Marlene Behrmann, Emery Brown, Yoshua Bengio, Charles H. Anderson, Randy McIntosh, Doug Bors, John Tsostos.

Past Waterloo Brain Days

April 2016 - 10th Waterloo Brain Day
April 2015 - 9th Waterloo Brain Day
April 2014 - 8th Waterloo Brain Day
April 2013 - 7th Waterloo Brain Day
April 2012 - 6th Waterloo Brain Day
April 2011 - 5th Waterloo Brain Day
April 2010 - 4th Waterloo Brain Day
April 2009 - 3rd Waterloo Brain Day
April 2008 - 2nd Waterloo Brain Day
April 2007 - 1st Waterloo Brain Day

Past Colloquium Speakers

2015|2016
2014|2015
2013|2014
2012|2013
2011|2012
2010|2011
2009|2010
2008|2009
2007|2008

Other Events

April 2007 - Frontiers of Theoretical Neuroscience
January 2007 - CTN Kickoff Meeting


 

Waterloo researchers among top in Canada

Chris Eliasmith writing on a whiteboardChris Eliasmith, Director of the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience, received the prestigious John C. Polanyi Award  and is also an inaugural member of the Royal Society of Canada's College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists.

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  1. 2017 (4)
    1. April (1)
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    3. February (1)
  2. 2016 (8)
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    3. April (1)
    4. March (2)
    5. February (1)
  3. 2015 (9)
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  5. 2013 (9)
  6. 2012 (4)

How to Build a Brain

Chris Eliasmith’s team at the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience has built Spaun, the world’s largest simulation of a functioning brain. The related book is now available and for the full article Waterloo Stories.

Nengo

This is a collection of coverage of work with Nengo (Neural Engineering Objects) that has appeared in the popular press recently.