Chemistry Seminar Series: Dr. Jaclyn BrussoExport this event to calendar

Wednesday, November 20, 2013 — 2:30 PM EST

Multifunctional Materials for Molecular Electronics

Dr. Jaclyn Brusso
Department of Chemistry
University of Ottawa

Wednesday, November 20, 2013
2:30 p.m.
C2-361 (Reading Room)

Abstract:  Since the digital revolution, information storage and global communications have transformed how we live. Essential to the continuation of technological advancements is the need for smaller, lighter, cheaper and more efficient electronic, optical and magnetic materials. Current electronic devices are typically based on inorganic materials (e.g., Si), which require a top-down lithographic approach to fabrication. Consequently, scaling down of current technologies indefinitely is not possible. Future generations of molecular electronics will therefore require the development of new materials with new functionalities, as simply employing existing materials at a reduced scale is not feasible. We aim to address these challenges through the design and synthesis of new magneto-optoelectronic materials for molecular electronics (e.g., molecular wires and fibers, organic light emitting diodes, field effect transistors, photovoltaic cells, magnetic switches, etc.). Since performance of electronics critically depends on the extent of molecular order (in addition to other factors), rational engineering of self-organizing molecular systems with multifunctional characteristics is one of the most attractive and active fields of current research. In pursuit of this goal, we aim to develop closed and open shell compounds with specific molecular architectures in order to achieve dimensional control over phase separation at the nanoscale. This strategy allows us to investigate the role structure and morphology play in the overall properties of advanced functional materials so that we may understand and, ultimately control, their self-assembly. In that regard, the preparation and characterization of organomain group semiconductors and radicals currently being pursued within our lab will be discussed.

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