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Chemistry Seminar Series: Joe GilroyExport this event to calendar

Thursday, March 30, 2017 — 10:30 AM EDT

Phosphorus chemistry as a tool for the production of metal-containing polymers

Joe Gilroy, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry
Western University

Room:  C2 361
Host:  Xiaosong Wang

Abstract:  Metal-containing polymers (MCPs) are processable materials that offer many unique properties originating from the transition metals that they incorporate. Depending on the type of metal and the polymer structure, MCPs have been successfully used, for example, as magnetic, catalytic, emissive, antimicrobial, redox-active, and preceramic materials.1 The continued need for new functional materials has motivated us to take advantage of the unique chemistry of phosphorus to synthesize metal-containing polymers containing different combinations of iron, ruthenium, and tungsten. Starting from phosphine gas, we prepared phosphines containing one, two, or three metallocene units before they were converted into polymerizable phosphines and phosphonium salts.2 The free-radical polymerization of the monomers produced, polyelectrolytes with unusual redox properties,3 heterobimetallic polyelectrolytes with utility as precursors to nanostructured metal phosphides,4 and the first example of a polymer containing three different transition metals per repeating unit.5 This presentation will detail our recent progress surrounding the design, synthesis, characterization, and applications of phosphorus-based metal-containing polymers and polyelectrolytes.

  1. Whittell, G. R.; Hager, M. D.; Schubert U. S.; Manners, I. Nat. Mater. 2011, 10, 176-188.
  2. Rabiee Kenaree, A.; Cuthbert, T.J.; Barbon, S.M.; Boyle, P.D.; Gillies, E.R.; Ragogna, P.J.; Gilroy, J.B. Organometallics 2015, 34, 4272-4280.
  3. Rabiee Kenaree, A.; Berven, B.M.; Ragogna, P.J.; Gilroy, J.B. Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 10714-10717.
  4. Rabiee Kenaree, A.; Gilroy, J.B. Dalton Trans. 2016, 45, 18229-18240.
  5. Rabiee Kenaree, A.; Gilroy, J.B. Submitted.
 

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