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Biochemistry profiles

Thorsten Dieckmann

Thorsten Dieckmann

Associate Professor & Associate Chair, Graduate Studies and Research

Thorsten Dieckmann's research interests include the biophysics of RNA, structure and function of RNA and proteins, high resolution NMR spectroscopy, catalysis, drug design, viral infections, RNA world and the origin of life.

Thorsten is the Director of the Insititute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology.

Guy Guillemette

Guy Guillemette

Associate Professor

Guy Guillemette carries out research in the area of biochemistry. His research focuses on the synthesis of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide is an important endogenous messenger in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes.

John Honek

John Honek

Professor

John Honek's research seeks to understand the fundamental interactions of small molecules (such as substrates and drugs) with enzymes as well as the mechanisms by which enzymes catalyze reactions.

His research in this area includes mechanistic enzymology, recombinant DNA and biophysical methods as well as organic synthesis, medicinal chemistry and molecular modeling. An additional focus is in the area of bionanotechnology and the application of biological chemistry to the synthesis of new nanomaterials and nanostructures.

Professor Elizabeth Meiering.

Elizabeth Meiering

Professor

Liz Meiering’s research is focused on protein folding, dynamics, function, engineering and design.

Her research targets understanding neurodegenerative diseases like ALS, as well as engineering proteins to understand their fundamental characteristics. She also develops proteins for applications in biotechnology, including protein drugs.

Michael Palmer

Michael Palmer

Associate Professor

Michael Palmer carries out research in biochemistry. His research focuses on the interaction of peptides and proteins with biological membranes. One current area of interest is the action mode of lipopeptide antibiotic daptomycin, as well as the mechanism of bacterial resistance to it.