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Inorganic Chemistry profiles

Holger Kleinke

Holger Kleinke

Professor & Interim Executive Director, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology

Holger Kleinke's research focuses on finding and optimizing new thermoelectric materials. Thermoelectrics are capable of converting heat into electrical energy and vice versa. This environmentally friendly energy conversion currently has several applications, but is limited by its low efficiency. His research group is attempting to increase the efficiency so that thermoelectrics may be used to recover electricity from the nowadays abundant waste heat, e.g. in the exhaust of automobiles.

Sonny Lee

Sonny Lee

Associate Professor

Sonny Lee's research efforts focus on challenging problems in transition element inorganic chemistry. His studies involve the synthesis of new compounds and compound classes, and the characterization of their physical and chemical properties by a broad array of methods.

Linda Nazar

Linda Nazar

University Professor & Canada Research Chair Solid State Energy Materials

Linda Nazar carries out research in inorganic materials chemistry, solid state chemistry and electrochemistry. Her research is focused on the development of electrochemical energy storage devices and materials.

One of the most interesting aspects of materials chemistry is the design of structures with specific physical properties. Using guided principles, Prof. Nazar’s team synthesizes new materials, determines their structures and investigates their physical properties. She is, in particular, interested in ion and electron transport in materials as these properties are central to solid state electrochemistry and energy storage batteries.

Richard Oakley

Richard Oakley

Professor Emeritus

Richard Oakley's research work spans the three-way interface between chemistry, physics and materials science. He designs, synthesizes and characterizes the molecular and solid state properties of neutral radicals, radical ions and biradicals, with the long term goal of generating processable molecular materials exhibiting unusual magnetic, conductive and/or optical properties.

Richard received the E.W.R. Steacie Award from the Canadian Society for Chemistry in 2016 and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

Rodney Smith

Rodney Smith

Assistant Professor

Rodney Smith’s research involves the study of electrocatalysts for use in sustainable energy storage systems. His research examines the chemistry of electrode surfaces, measures electron transfer kinetics and probes electrochemical reaction dynamics in an effort to guide the design and fabrication of solid-state electrocatalysts.

He will begin his position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry in May 2017.