Change matters...

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The Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change (IC3) brings together experts across disciplines to consider the impacts of climate change from every angle. A fresh approach, built on smart science, working toward achievable solutions – because at Waterloo, change really does matter.

Established in 2008, ICseeks to advance research on climate change by facilitating interdisciplinary research and providing relevant scientific information that empowers business, government and civil society to prepare and respond effectively to weather events and climate change.

  1. Feb. 23, 2018Wild Weather Lecture Serieswild weather event

    Wild Weather Talks and Roundtable: Our Changing Climate

    The Waterloo Region Museum is hosting a special presentation and roundtable discussion about climate change in the Region of Waterloo and across the globe. The Roundtable discussion will take place on March 22nd at the Waterloo Region Museum.

  2. Jan. 29, 2018Canada in a Climate-Disrupted Worldworld map

    The impacts of climate change are seen across the globe and are increasingly affecting our economies and societies. Adaptation to climate change is and will continue to be one of the greatest policy challenges facing the Canadian government. Despite existing knowledge on climate change impacts and adaptation, understanding the future of climate change is a complex and on-going process with many gaps existing in the body of academic, government, and other policy-relevant publications.

  3. Jan. 26, 2018Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in the Face of Climate ChangeWinter in Fruhling


    Studies led by the University of Waterloo, with a group of multinational researchers, have identified that climate change is threatening the future of the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Temperatures are rising with the increase of global green house gas emissions, affecting the ability to reliably host the winter games across the globe. The average February daytime  temperature of the Olympic Winter Games locations is steadily increasing - from 0.48C in the 1920–1950s, to 3.18C in the 1960–1990s, to 7.88C in games held in the twenty-first century - intensifying the need for weather risk management strategies.

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