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National Pan-Canadian Expert Collaboration on climate change and clean energy development has just been announced!

Waterloo’s Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation and the Interdisciplinary Centre on Climate Change are partners in the collaboration and will work closely with the institute to achieve its objectives. IC3 member and head of the Intact Centre, Blair Feltmate, will be a member of the new institute's Adaptation Expert Panel.

Burnout and Despair: Studying the Climate

IC3 Member, Jason Thistlethwaite, joins fellow climate scientists on The Agenda with Steve Paikin to discuss the psychological impacts of studying climate change. Jason shares his expert opinion on the emotional toll of climate change research, the solutions to mitigate climate anxiety, and how to cope and feel empowered to take action.

In December 2018, IC3 and the Univeristy of Waterloo sent six students to the 24th Session of the Conference of the Parties (“COP24”) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). COP24 was held in Katowice, Poland, bringing togeher international leaders to discuss climate change and the next steps in implementing the Paris Agreement.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

IPCC Climate Change Report

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has issued a special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C. The IPCC, a group of scientists convened by the United Nations to guide world leaders, explores the detrimental impacts of climate change on the world, such as food shortages, increase in wildfires and a mass die-off of coral reefs, which could take place as soon as 2040.

Studies led by the University of Waterloo, with a group of multinational researchers, have identified that climate change is threatening the future of the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Temperatures are rising with the increase of global green house gas emissions, affecting the ability to reliably host the winter games across the globe. The average February daytime  temperature of the Olympic Winter Games locations is steadily increasing - from 0.48C in the 1920–1950s, to 3.18C in the 1960–1990s, to 7.88C in games held in the twenty-first century - intensifying the need for weather risk management strategies.

 

Last fall, the global media spotlight was on the United Nations climate change summit (a.k.a. “COP21”) when 195 countries came to an agreement to act on climate change.

Are you curious about what this might mean for our community, our country and the world?

One million migrants arrived in Europe in 2015 seeking asylum from war and conflict. Yet many researchers warn these numbers are small compared with the number of people who will be displaced global in coming decades because of climate change. Will the next great waves of international migration have environmental causes? What are the potential implications for North America? What can we do now to prepare for future climate migration? Join Canadian and American experts in an open discussion of what we know about global environmental migration, and what research has yet to tell us.

This week, political leaders from all over the world, including new Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, will arrive in Paris to negotiate a plan to fight global climate change. The University of Waterloo is sending a handful of students to be on the ground in the French capital as the historic agreement unfolds around them.