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Monday, February 26, 2018 — 10:30 AM EST

Title: Random Networks: Enumeration, Generation, and Universality

Speaker: Pu (Jane) Gao
Affilliation: Monash University
Room: DC 1304

Abstract:

Large networks appear in almost all branches of the sciences and in everyday life, and they are often modeled by random graphs. Among the various random graph models, random graphs with specified degrees are particularly important in modelling and analyzing real-world networks.

Friday, February 16, 2018 — 3:30 PM EST

Title: Tangent Lines and the equation 28 = 7 × 4

Speaker: Yoav Len
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

I will discuss combinatorial aspects of tangent lines to curves and planar graphs. In algebraic geometry, every smooth plane curve has finitely many lines that are tangent to it at two separate points.

Thursday, February 15, 2018 — 3:30 PM EST

Title: An introduction to gammoids

Speaker: Rutger Campbell
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5479

Abstract:

A gammoid is a matroid that is defined via vertex connectivity in a graph.

Thursday, February 15, 2018 — 1:30 PM EST

Title: Mixing in Discrete-Time Quantum Walks

Speaker: Harmony Zhan
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 6486

Abstract:

Discrete-time quantum walks are building blocks for quantum algorithms. There are some parameters of a quantum walk that affect the performance of a quantum algorithm, such as the (time-averaged) limiting distribution and the mixing time.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 — 4:00 PM EST

Title: Comprehensive robust counterparts of uncertain problems

Speaker: Sina Rezazadeh
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5479

Abstract:

We continue our study of Robust Optimization by discussing the paper by Ben-Tal,  Boyd and Nemirovski, "Extending scope of robust optimization: comprehensive robust counterparts of uncertain problems."

Friday, February 9, 2018 — 3:30 PM EST

Title: Post-Quantum Group-based Cryptography

Speaker: Delaram Kahrobaei
Affiliation: New York University
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

The National Security Agency (NSA) in August 2015 announced plans to transition to post-quantum algorithms 

Thursday, February 8, 2018 — 3:30 PM EST

Title: An introduction to vertex minors

Speaker: Jim Geelen
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5479

Abstract:

This introductory lecture on vertex minors of graphs will highlight the similarities and differences with minors of graphs. We will also discuss the main conjectures relating to vertex minors.

Thursday, February 8, 2018 — 1:30 PM EST

Title: Constructing Graphs Pseudo-Similar Vertices

Speaker: Cathy Wang
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 6486

Abstract:

Let G be a graph. Let a and b be vertices in G, then a and b are pseudo-similar if G\a is isomorphic to G\b, but there's no automorphism of G that maps a onto b.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018 — 4:00 PM EST

Title: Robust Convex Optimization 

Speaker: Nargiz Kalantarova
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5479

Abstract:

We continue our study of convex optimization problems with uncertain data by discussing the paper by Ben-Tal and Nemirovski, 'Robust Convex Optimization'.

Tuesday, February 6, 2018 — 4:30 PM EST

Title: An Introduction to Quantum Graphs, Chromatic Numbers and Lovász Inequalties

Speaker: Arthur Mehta 
Affiliation: Pure Math - University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

Quantum graph theory, also known as non-commutative graph theory, is an operator system generalization of graph theory. Quantum graphs were first used to extend the notion of one-shot-zero-error capacity of a "Noisy Channel" to "Quantum Channels". 

Monday, February 5, 2018 — 9:30 PM EST

Title: Algorithms and complexity for quantum advantage

Speaker: David Gosset
Affiliation: IBM - T.J. Watson Research Center
Room: QNC 0101

Abstract:

There is strong evidence that a sufficiently large fault-tolerant quantum computer would solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical computer. How can quantum algorithms and complexity theory help guide the way forward in our current era of small and noisy quantum computers?

Monday, February 5, 2018 — 1:00 PM EST

Title: ALBANIS: A brief overview of Lattice-Based NIST Submissions

Speaker: Luis Ruiz
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 6486

Abstract:

Now that the NIST competition is in the first round of the review process, it is our turn to take a look at the submissions (at least, briefly).

Friday, February 2, 2018 — 9:30 AM EST

Title: Polynomial systems: Graphical structure, Geometry, and Applications

Speaker: Diego Cifuentes
Affiliation: MIT
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

Various problems in areas such as robotics, power systems, computer vision, cryptography, and chemical reaction networks, can be modeled by systems of polynomial equations, and in many cases the resulting systems have a simple sparsity structure.

Thursday, February 1, 2018 — 1:30 PM EST

Title: On Pretty Good State Transfer, Entanglement, and Spin Chains

Speaker: Christopher van Bommel
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 6486

Abstract: 

We discuss the Vieira and Rigolin paper “Almost perfect transport of an entangled two-qubit state through a spin chain”,

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