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Please note: The University of Waterloo is closed for all events until further notice.

Events - 2018

Friday, October 19, 2018 — 1:00 PM EDT

Title: Primal-dual and Lagrangian relaxation techniques for k-median

Speaker: Madison Van Dyk
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room:  MC 5479

Abstract: We will develop primal-dual algorithms to obtain constant-factor approximations for the uncapacitated facility location problem.

Thursday, October 18, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Extending Thomassen’s Theorem to Two Faces

Speaker: Joshua Nevin
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room:  MC 5417

Abstract:

Let G be a planar graph and let L be a list-assignment for G in which there is a precolored edge on the outer face, every other vertex on the outer face has a list of size at least 3, and every other vertex in G has a list of size at least 5.

Thursday, October 18, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Title: Graphs of Homomorphisms

Speaker: Chris Godsil
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 6486

Abstract: If X and Y are graphs and f is a function on V (X) taking values in V (Y ), then the graph of
f is the subset formed by the pairs (x; f(x)) for x in V (X).

Wednesday, October 17, 2018 — 4:00 PM EDT

Title: Tutorial on back-propagation and automatic differentiation

Speaker: Steve Vavasis
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5479

Abstract: In this presentation, I'll cover the basics of automatic differentiation (AD).

Wednesday, October 17, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Basis Shape Loci and the Positive Grassmannian

Speaker: Cameron Marcot
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 6483

Abstract: We study the set of k-dimensional planes in R^n admitting a basis of vectors with prescribed supports.

Friday, October 12, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Title: Offline Assisted Group Key Exchange

Speaker: Gareth Davies
Affiliation: Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)
Room: MC 5417

Abstract:

This talk will focus on the problem of forward secrecy in group key exchange (GKE), where most of the participants remain offline until they wish to compute the key.

Thursday, October 4, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Representable orientable matroids that are not real-representable

Speaker:  Rutger Campbell
Affiliation: University of Waterllo
Room: MC 5417

Abstract: In this talk we will have a brief introduction to oriented matroids and their relation to real-representability.

Thursday, October 4, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Title: Controllable graphs

Speaker:   Chris Godsil
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 6486

Abstract: A graph is controllable if no eigenvector is orthogonal to the all-ones vector.

Wednesday, October 3, 2018 — 4:00 PM EDT

Title: Review of martingale theory, stochastic gradient descent, and adaptive line-line-search for stochastic optimization.

Speaker: Courtney Paquette
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5479

Abstract: With the rise of large data sets, practical algorithms for machine learning often use probability and statistics.

Friday, September 28, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: The Shapiro-Shapiro Conjecture

Speaker: Kevin Purbhoo
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

Given four lines in 3-space, can you find a fifth line that intersects the other four? How many?

This is the smallest non-trivial example of a "Schubert problem". The answer, in this case, is not hard to compute: there are two such lines. Generalizations of this fact date back to 19th century work of Schubert.

Thursday, September 27, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: A characterization of (p,q)-mixing when p/q < 4

Speaker: Ben Moore
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5417

Abstract: Let Hom(G,H) be the graph whose vertex set is the set of H-colourings of G, and two H-colourings f and g are adjacent if f differs from g in at most one vertex.

Wednesday, September 26, 2018 — 4:00 PM EDT

Title: Classification, Regularization and Logistic Regression

Speaker: Haesol Im
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5479

Abstract: For the first two seminar series in machine learning,

Friday, September 21, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Quantum advantage with shallow circuits

Speaker: David Gosset
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

A constant-depth quantum circuit is a parallel quantum computation that proceeds for a constant number of time steps.  In this work we prove that constant-depth quantum circuits are more powerful than their classical counterparts.

Thursday, September 20, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Naji’s characterization of circle graphs

Speaker: Jim Geelen
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5417

Abstract: A circle graph is the intersection graph of chords of a circle.

Friday, September 14, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Rapid mixing of Glauber dynamics for colorings below Vigoda’s 11/6 threshold 

Speaker: Michelle Delcourt
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

A well-known conjecture in computer science and statistical physics is that Glauber dynamics on the set of k-colorings of a graph G on n vertices with maximum degree Δ is rapidly mixing for k ≥ Δ+2.

Friday, September 14, 2018 — 11:30 AM EDT

Title: Science of Security-- Could Such a Thing Exist?

Speaker: Paul van Oorschot
Affiliation: Carelton University
Room: MC 5501

Abstract: Recent years have seen increasing calls to make security research more "scientific". Who can argue with science being desirable?

Thursday, September 13, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Entropy and enumeration

Speaker: Jorn van der Pol
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5417

Abstract: The information-theoretic concept of entropy is closely related to enumeration;

Friday, September 7, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: The smallest eigenvalues of Hamming, Johnson and other graphs

Speaker: Sebastian Cioaba
Affiliation: University of Delaware
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

The smallest eigenvalue of graphs is closely related to other graph parameters such as the independence number, the chromatic number or the max-cut.

Thursday, August 16, 2018 — 11:30 AM EDT

Title: Counting Partitions Inside a Rectangle

Speaker: Steve Melczer
Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania
Room: MC 6486

Abstract:

The study of integer partitions is a classic subject with applications ranging from number theory to representation theory and combinatorics.

Friday, August 3, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: The geometry of matroids

Speaker:  Federico Ardila
Affiliation: San Francisco State University
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

Matroid theory is a combinatorial theory of independence which has its origins in linear algebra and graph theory, and turns out to have deep connections with many other fields.

Friday, July 27, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Algorithms for Rank-1 Bimatrix Games

Speaker: Bernhard von Stengel
Affiliation: London School of Economics
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

The rank of a bimatrix game is the matrix rank of the sum of the two payoff matrices.

Thursday, July 26, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Acyclic Colouring of Graphs on Surfaces

Speaker: Shayla Redlin
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5479

Abstract: An acyclic k-colouring of a graph G is a proper k-colouring of G with no

Friday, July 20, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Claw-free matroids

Speaker: Peter Nelson
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5501

Abstract: A simple binary matroid is claw-free if it has no independent rank-3 flat. I will discuss a structure theorem, obtained jointly with Kazuhiro Nomoto, that classifies these objects exactly.

Thursday, July 19, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Title: Density and Structure of Homomorphism-Critical Graphs

Speaker: Evelyne Smith-Roberge
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5417

Abstract: 

Let H be a graph. A graph G is H-critical if every proper subgraph of G admits a homomor-
phism to H, but G itself does not.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018 — 3:00 PM EDT

Title: Using Linear Algebra to do Matching Theory

Speaker: Justin Toth
Affiliation: University of Waterloo
Room: MC 5501

Abstract:

A matching in a graph is a set of edges with each vertex contained in at most one edge. A perfect matching is a matching in which each vertex is contained in some edge.

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