Frequently asked questions

  1. What is Computational Mathematics?
  2. Why should I pursue an education in Computational Math?
  3. What are the differences between Computational Math and Computer Science, Pure Math and Applied Math?
  4. What can I expect in my first year?
  5. What are the admission requirements for Computational Math?
  6. How much does it cost?
  7. Am I eligible for scholarships/bursaries?
  8. What kind of courses can I take as an undergraduate?
  9. What types of jobs can I get in a co-op term?
  10. What types of careers can I pursue after studying Computational Math?

1. What is Computational Mathematics?

Computational Mathematics is a hybrid program that sits at the intersection of mathematics and computer science. This program in the Faculty of Mathematics teaches students to exploit the increasing power of computers for solving industrial-size mathematical problems. Students who have strengths in both mathematics and computing will find this program particularly interesting.

2. Why should I pursue an education in Computational Math?

Computer scientists with strong math skills and mathematicians who are proficient with computers aren't as common as you may think, so Computational Math is meant to be the meeting point for the two fields. In more colloquial terms from the Computational Math Club's website:

Mathies still use Windows and CSers can't do induction, so CM is there to fill the gap.

3. What are the differences between Computational Math and Computer Science, Pure Math and Applied Math?

There are significant differences between all three programs. Applied math deals heavily with the applications of mathematics in various fields, such as biology or physics. Pure math is a very rigorous program that deals with many abstract math concepts and generally doesn't have as many applications as applied or computational math. Computer science involves using computers to solve problems through the design and implementation of algorithms. Computational math is a hybrid of all of these things, where you're required to be skilled in computer science and many advanced math topics to be able to solve problems which cannot be done by humans without computers.

4. What can I expect in my first year?

In your first year at the Faculty of Mathematics you will take the core math courses that every math student takes. These include Algebra, Calculus, and Computer Science, together with electives for those students interested in Computational Mathematics. Find out more about first year courses here.

5. What are the admission requirements for Computational Math?

The admission requirements for Computational Mathematics are the same as those for the Faculty of Mathematics if you are enrolling in first year. See the Faculty of Mathematics Admission Requirements.

If you are a UW student and are thinking of switching to the Computational Mathematics program please contact your Academic Advisor for more information.

6. How much does it cost?

Tuition varies from year to year. To see an estimate of first year tuition for Computational Mathematics, click here.

7. Am I eligible for scholarships/bursaries?

To learn more and find out whether you can apply for scholarships/bursaries please visit:

8. What kind of courses can I take as an undergraduate?

A wide variety of courses is available to students enrolled in Computational Mathematics, ranging from Applied Cryptography to Computational Modeling of Cellular Systems.

To see more about courses offered in Computational Mathematics, check the Undergraduate Calendar. The Schedule of Classes shows a list of courses being offered per term for undergraduate students.

9. What types of jobs can I get in a co-op term?

Examples of co-op students at work:

  • Actuarial Analyst - Co-op, The Economical Insurance Group, (Waterloo, ON)
  • Lead Software Developer, Web Development Canada, (Cambridge, ON)
  • Jr. Business Analyst Intern, Clear-to-Close Solutions (Denville, NJ, USA)
  • Quality Assurance Analyst - Digital, Indigo Books & Music Inc., (Toronto, ON)
  • Supply Chain Business Analyst, Mark's Work Warehouse (Calgary, AB)
  • Research Assistant, Dalhousie University (Halifax, NS)

10. What types of careers can I pursue after studying Computational Math?

Examples of Computational Mathematics students at work:

  • Network Manager, Canada Institute of Linguistics
  • Process & Technology Officer, Canadian National Railway Co.
  • Development Analyst, Network-Centric Prod & Technologies, IBM
  • Senior Structural Designer, Zefer Corporation
  • Security Analyst, 724 Solutions Inc.

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