2016 Farvolden Research SymposiumExport this event to calendar

Friday, October 21, 2016 — 8:30 AM to 5:30 PM EDT

Join the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences for a half-day research symposium as part of their annual Farvolden Lecture Series.

8:30 – 1:30 pm Research Symposium

  • 8:30 – 9:00 am DC 1301: Registration and refreshments
  • 9:00 – 9:45 am DC 1302: Dr. Christina Smeaton, Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ecohydrology Research Group, UW: Living on the energetic edge: Predicting microbial growth in low energy environments. Abstract.
  • 9:45 – 10:15 am DC 1301: Coffee Break
  • 10:15 – 11:00 am DC 1302: Prof. Nandita Basu, Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Dept. of Civil Engineering, UW: Down Under: The critical role of the subsurface in controlling surface water pollution. Abstract.
  • 11:00 – 12:00 DC 1302: Student 3 Minute Thesis presentations (Elaine Secord, Sean Morrison, Shawn Scott)
  • 12:00 – 1:30 pm DC 1301: Light lunch

2:00 – 3:30 pm Farvolden Lecture

Humanities Theatre, Hagey Hall, UW

Roger Woeller, M.Sc., FGAC, P.Geo., The Evolution of the Water Business from Resource Exploitation to Resource Recovery – The Challenge

Abstract and biography

3:30 – 5:30 pm Reception

Earth Sciences Museum, EIT first floor foyer: Cash bar and munchies.  Mingle with old friends and graduate students.

Registration

Email Lorraine Albrecht at klalbrec@ uwaterloo.ca to register. 

Please include the following choices along with your name, affiliation, address, phone number, fax and email address.

  • I will attend the 2016 Farvolden Lecture, Friday, October 21st at 2:00 pm in the Humanities Theatre, Hagey Hall. 

  • I will attend the Research Symposium to be held on Friday, October 21st between 9:00 and 1:30 pm. Cost is $100.00, $15.00 for students, which includes lunch. A cheque for the symposium should be made payable to: University of Waterloo.

  • I have included a donation for the Farvolden Endowment Fund.  A separate cheque should be made payable to: The Robert Farvolden Endowment Fund. A receipt will be sent to you after October 21, 2016. 

Send a hardcopy of this registration form (PDF) with your cheque(s) to Lorraine Albrecht:

Lorraine Albrecht
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences
University of Waterloo
Waterloo, ON  N2L 3G1      

Phone: 519-888-4567, ext. 32069   
Email: klalbrec@ uwaterloo.ca
Fax: 519-746-7484

Symposium abstracts

Dr. Christina Smeaton, Research Scientist, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ecohydrology Research Group, University of Waterloo

Living on the energetic edge: Predicting microbial growth in low energy environments

ABSTRACT

Traditional thermodynamic and kinetic biogeochemical models applied to natural environments rely heavily on either measured microbial growth yields (Y) or those predicted using standard bioenergetics-based methods. However, the impact of low energy supply on growth yields and their subsequent prediction is poorly understood. Consequently, the accuracy of the most commonly used bioenergetics-based static Y prediction models were evaluated by compiling 150 literature Y values mostly (i.e., ~58%) comprising low energy (< 25 kJ(mol e-)-1) metabolisms. Moreover, to account for energy supply we developed a bioenergetics-based version of the original substrate-based Pirt equation to model Geobacter sp. growth under natural and biostimulated conditions in the subsurface. We propose that this bioenergetics-based growth model may be implemented in larger biogeochemical reaction network-based models to reflect a fluctuating catabolic energy supply that is typical of natural environments.


Dr. Nandita Basu, Assistant Professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Department of Civil Engineering

Down Under: The Critical Role of the Subsurface in Controlling Surface Water Pollution

ABSTRACT

Water quality issues abound in the news:  Lake Erie eutrophication, the Gulf of Mexico dead zone, escalating costs of water treatment, and lawsuits to hold farmers accountable.  While the role of nonpoint-sources from agricultural and urban land use in degrading surface water quality is increasingly being recognized, most watershed models have a poor representation of the subsurface processes that modify the pollutants before they emerge in streams and lakes.  Much recent work, however, suggests that there are frequently significant time lags between changes in management practices on the landscape and measurable changes in surface water quality, largely due to both the accumulation of subsurface contaminant legacies and slow groundwater travel times.  Policy goals for improved water quality are routinely over-ambitious, often significantly underestimating the time required to achieve improvements in water quality due to an undervaluing of what’s “down under,” and the role that subsurface contaminant stores may play in controlling loading to surface water over multi-decadal time scales.  Our current focus is on developing parsimonious approaches to modeling connectivity between the surface and subsurface, explicitly taking into account long-term contaminant legacies and their impact on surface water quality. 

Cost 
Registration required for the symposium, which includes lunch: $100 per person, $15 for students
Location 
DC - William G. Davis Computer Research Centre
Room 1302
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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