Space-time vegetation dynamics as a diagnostic tool of forest watershed systemsExport this event to calendar

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 — 2:00 PM EDT

Presenter: Dr. Taehee Hwang
Institute for the Environment, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Refreshments served

Abstract:

Vegetation dynamics are important drivers to characterize seasonal and annual water and carbon budgets. Spatial evolution of the ecosystem is related to long-term adjustments of vegetation to given geomorphic, climatic, and hydrologic settings. Phenological shifts represent short-term vegetation responses to climatic variability, which has been a major subject for global climate change research. In particular, the large, local variability of meteorological and edaphic conditions in steep terrain provides a unique opportunity to diagnose canopy responses to the interaction of climate and landscape positions. The spatio-temporal vegetation dynamics are estimated at different scales from several sets of remote sensing imagery in Coweeta Hydrologic Lab (NC, USA). Spatial organization of vegetation within forested headwater catchments is provided to effectively represent the level of partitioning between localized water use and lateral water flow along hydrologic flow paths, further related to optimization of system-wide carbon uptake. Spatial variation of local vegetation phenology derived from MODIS vegetation indices are closely related to the combined effect of topoclimatic variation, vegetation community types, and soil water availability. Understanding current space-time vegetation dynamics upon imposed topoclimatic variability offers a potential to predict watershed system responses to contemporary climate change. it also facilitates the use of high resolution daily vegetation density by fusing multi-temporal MODIS and Landsat TM data to link dynamic canopy measurements with integrated process descriptions within a distributed ecohydrological modeling framework. This research helps to understand complicated climate-ecosystem-hydrology feedbacks between vegetation water use (green water) and lateral hydrological redistribution (blue water) in complex terrain, and ecosystem responses in near-future climate changes. 

Location 
EIT - Centre for Environmental and Information Technology
room 3142
200 University Ave West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

S M T W T F S
27
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
  1. 2021 (4)
    1. May (1)
    2. March (2)
    3. February (1)
  2. 2020 (5)
    1. November (1)
    2. August (1)
    3. March (2)
    4. January (1)
  3. 2019 (38)
  4. 2018 (53)
  5. 2017 (96)
  6. 2016 (50)
  7. 2015 (50)
  8. 2014 (47)
  9. 2013 (40)
  10. 2012 (38)
  11. 2011 (20)
  12. 2010 (10)