Monday, January 25, 2021

The Dark Zone of Greenland: How algae fuelled by phosphorus contributes to ice sheet melting

Jenine McCutcheon sampling snow on the Greenland Ice Sheet

Greenland is the world’s largest “non-continental” island, and about 80 per cent of this island is covered by the Greenland Ice Sheet. In recent years, however, the melting of this ice sheet has accelerated, leading to an increased contribution to rising sea levels.

Thursday, December 17, 2020

Restoring wetlands near farms would dramatically reduce water pollution

Targeted wetland restoration in heavily farmed areas would dramatically reduce the amount of nitrogen polluting rivers, lakes and coastal areas, a new study finds.

Researchers at the University of Waterloo and the University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) examined detailed data on wetland locations and nitrogen loads from fertilizer on farm fields throughout the United States.

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Early ocean anoxia may have led to first mass extinction event

Dengying Formation (South China)

A new study by an international collaboration involving Earth and Environmental Sciences Professor Brian Kendall suggests the world’s first mass extinction event 540 million years ago was caused by a widespread loss of dissolved oxygen in the Earth’s oceans.

Monday, May 28, 2018

Phosphexᵀᴹ wraps up field testing as a $10 million George Barley Water Prize contender

Phosphex field testing in Holland Marsh, Ontario.

Today, the University of Waterloo PhosphexTM team wraps up its field tests where they’ve demonstrated their technology’s ability to remove phosphorus from Holland Marsh in Bradford, Ontario.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Gulf of Mexico dead zone not expected to shrink anytime soon

Satellite image of the northern Gulf of Mexico in April 2009. Image credit: NASA.

Achieving water quality goals for the Gulf of Mexico may take decades, according to findings by researchers at the University of Waterloo.

The results, published today in Science, suggest that policy goals for reducing the size of the northern Gulf of Mexico’s dead zone may be unrealistic, and that major changes in agricultural and river management practices may be necessary to achieve the desired improvements in water quality.