Thursday, March 22, 2018

Gulf of Mexico dead zone not expected to shrink anytime soon

Satellite image of the northern Gulf of Mexico in April 2009. Image credit: NASA.

Achieving water quality goals for the Gulf of Mexico may take decades, according to findings by researchers at the University of Waterloo.

The results, published today in Science, suggest that policy goals for reducing the size of the northern Gulf of Mexico’s dead zone may be unrealistic, and that major changes in agricultural and river management practices may be necessary to achieve the desired improvements in water quality.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Two major avalanches linked to climate change, according to international study involving Waterloo

LANDSAT-8 image (obtained October 14, 2016) of the July (upper) and September (lower) glacier collapses in Western Tibet.

A study released today in Nature Geoscience describes how climate change played a major role in the massive catastrophic collapse of two glaciers in the Tibetan Plateau in July and September 2016.

Friday, October 28, 2016

Collapsing glaciers story in The Atlantic features Professor Stephen Evans

LANDSAT-8 image (obtained October 14, 2016) of the July (upper) and September (lower) glacier collapses in Western Tibet.

The collapse of the Kolka glacier in the Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia back in 2002 was so unusually fast, Earth scientists like Stephen Evans, a professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, thought they would never see another event like it.

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Fertilizer applied to fields today will pollute water for decades

Research shows nitrogen is accumulating in soil - creating health risks like “blue baby syndrome” and environmental dead zones in rivers and oceans.

Friday, November 20, 2015

Earth scientists suggest a whiff from blue-green algae likely responsible for Earth’s oxygen

Earth's oxygen-rich atmosphere emerged in whiffs from a kind of blue-green algae in shallow oceans around 2.5 billion years ago, according to new research from Canadian and American scientists.

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