Environment Seminar Series: ENV Grad Students Export this event to calendar

Friday, March 1, 2019 — 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM EST

seminar series poster

Our Faculty is proud to present the latest installament of our Dean's Seminar Series, but this time we're doing something different by showcasing our grad students' research! On March 1st from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., you will have the opportunity to learn what some of our Faculty's PhD students are doing. Come to AL 105 for a free lunch and five fifteen minute presentations about various environmental topics! Here are the five speakers along with a short description of their talk:     <--break-><--break-><--break-><--break->    

Samantha Biglieri, School of Planning: The Right to (Re)Shape the City as a Person Living with Dementia

In Canada, the number of people living with dementia (PLWD) is set to increase 66% to 937,000 by 2031, and estimates show that approximately 2/3 of PLWD live in the community (as opposed to congregate living). While there has been limited research on the impact of the built environment on PLWD, it has focused on planning outcomes, with no research on access to the planning process that shapes the places they live in. With participants, we attended public open house planning meetings in Waterloo to understand barriers to and facilitators of accessibility for PLWD. The results produced easily implementable recommendations in three areas that would make open houses more accessible to PLWD: communication, physical/sensory environment and presentation of information.<--break->

Chris Luderitz, GEM: Brewing up sustainability transitions: the role of knowledge in niche construction

How can sustainability-oriented initiatives transform a concentrated and internationally connected industry toward sustainability? What may sound unattainable has started to happen in the beer industry with small and locally owned breweries transforming the conventional logics and practices, supporting sustainability transformations across sectors. This talk will detail this process by examining the role of knowledge in niche construction. Based on empirical research in Canada and Germany, key lessons are drawn from how craft breweries convert knowledge to construct niches that support sustainability-oriented innovations in an otherwise hostile environment.<--break->

Sisir Pradhan, SEED: Social-ecological perspective and dried fish value chain

Sisir's research is about the significance of a social-ecological systems perspective in furthering our understanding of dried fish value chain. Dried fish contribution to food and nutrition security of the poor is considered significant. Its primary production (i.e., drying, smoking, fermenting and salting) and trade are an important source of livelihoods and employment for millions of producers. Additionally, it provides economic and occupational engagement to a significant number of people who work across various nodes of the dried fish value chain. However, value chain discussions have almost entirely focused on defining its nodes based on economic, financial and market based criteria. The absence of acomprehensive view of value chain involving economic, social and ecological components and their dynamic interactions is evident. Sisir's research aims to address this gap by drawing on social-ecological systems thinking to highlight resource dynamics and its interactions with dried fish producers as the basis of a new node in dried fish value chain. <--break->

Evan Andrews, SERSStrengthening the Governance of Fisheries through Human Behaviour Research in Atlantic Canada.

Human behaviour is an under-examined aspect in Canadian fisheries governance.  With human behaviour research, we can identify opportunities to strengthen governance by understanding fishers’ motivations to cooperate, share resources, follow rules, and respond to social-ecological change. Evan is examining this opportunity through experiences with the governance of mixed inshore fisheries (e.g., shrimp, crab, lobster, cod, scallop, and squid) in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada and documents fisher behaviours, including the motivations behind decisions to invest, leave, diversify or join a fishery.  Evan uses a state-of-the-art transdisciplinary approach that combines sciences of the brain and mind, storytelling methods with fishers and their families, and the policy sciences. Evan’s research is funded through the Joseph-Armand Bombardier, Doctoral Scholarship from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council and the OceanCanada Partnership.<--break->

Nick Revington, School of Planning: Planning, Finance, and the Making of Waterloo’s Student Housing Submarket

With over 17,500 bed spaces, Waterloo is home to nearly half the country’s private student-oriented development and represents the leading edge of financial capital’s interest in student housing in Canada. This talk demonstrates how this unique circumstance is the combined product of over 30 years of local planning and finance’s pursuit of increasingly niche real estate sectors, and the broader lessons it offers about contemporary urban development.<--break->

Where & When?

Friday March 1

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

AL 105

Cost 
Free
Location 
AL - Arts Lecture Hall
Rm 105
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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