Knowledge Integration Seminar: Collaborative Governance Structures for Sustainable Community Plan ImplementationExport this event to calendar

Friday, January 17, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 4:00 PM EST
Speaker: Amelia Clarke
This presentation offers original findings about options for implementing
sustainable community plans through a partnership approach. After introducing the key concepts of collaboration, collaborative strategic management and sustainable community plans, the presentation will detail the key results of Dr. Clarke's research on the implementation of collaborative community sustainability plans in Canada.  These plans are created by and for local communities and involve numerous partners (including businesses, universities, governments and NGOs).
 
The presentation will offer a focused look at four cases, each representing a different implementation models: Montreal’s Collective Sustainable Development Strategy, Hamilton’s Vision 2020, Vancouver’s citiesPLUS and Whistler 2020. The presentation will also highlight recent findings from a survey of Canadian communities. By considering how these initiatives were structured (i.e., which organizations were involved, what processes were put in place, what committee (or other) structure was used, how progress was monitored, etc.), and by considering what was achieved, lessons are offered on what approaches are most effective for achieving desired results.
 
Dr. Amelia Clarke has over twenty years of experience with sustainable
development topics. Prior to becoming a professor most of her work was in the non-profit sector, including founding the Sierra Youth Coalition (1996), being the President of Sierra Club Canada (from 2003-2006), and sitting on the Canadian government delegation to the United Nations World Summit on Sustainable Development negotiations (2002). She started in 1989 as an environmentalist, and over time came to realize the importance of sustainable development. It is this involvement in sustainable development topics that led to her academic choices, including the decision to complete a PhD in business strategy. While her values are still highly informed by a deep respect for nature, Dr. Clarke also believes that humans are a part of the ecological system, and that we are capable of designing our economic systems to be within ecological limits and our social systems to enhance people’s wellbeing. Our current trajectory is not sustainable, and thus a shift to sustainable development is necessary.
 
Dr. Clarke is now a faculty member in the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development (SEED) at the University of Waterloo, and Director of our Master of Environment and Business (MEB) executive education program. She is also on the executive team of the Social Responsibility division of the Administrative Science Association of Canada (ASAC). ASAC is the Canadian association for business professors. Her academic training includes a BSc (Biology) from Mount Allison University, an MES (Environmental Management) from Dalhousie University, and a PhD (Management) from McGill University. All of her current research is on sustainable development. She teaches ENBUS
602: Introduction to Sustainability for Business; ENBUS 640: Sustainability Strategies for Enterprises; and ENBUS 102: Introduction to Environment and Business. In summary, Dr. Clarke's life’s work is focused on helping society move towards sustainability.
Location 
EV3 - Environment 3
Room 1408
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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