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Wednesday, May 20, 2020

GESP and adapting to COVID-19 crisis

Edward Burtynsky lecture for GESP students

The Global Engagement Seminar's ARTS 490, The Future of Nature, was among the 975 Faculty of Arts courses that had to pivot to online delivery in mid-March. The class was deep into preparing final team projects that would have been presented at the public Summit held at the Balsillie School in early April. Along with the Summit cancellation, there would also be no public keynotes by the GES mentors, renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky and prolific scholar and expert on socio-political activism Mike Davis.

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

ARTS 490 still open for applications

forest with large clear cut section

Bring your intellectual curiosity and commitment to engage in interdisciplinary discussions about THE FUTURE OF NATURE. APPLY FOR ARTS 490 TODAYAs of November 25, 2019, we are accepting applications on a rolling basis until the class reaches its cap.

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Meet the first 2020 Jarislowsky Fellow!

Edward Burtynsky with special camera equipment

This year's first Fellow is EDWARD BURTYNSKY. He is regarded as one of the world's most accomplished contemporary photographers. His remarkable photographic depictions of global industrial landscapes are included in the collections of over sixty major museums around the world, including the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of Modern Art and the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid, the Tate Modern in London, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in California.

Friday, October 5, 2018

The 2019 Global Engagement Team

Monday, April 16, 2018

Dear Humanities Profs: We Are the Problem

Dismayed about American politics? Look in the mirror.

By Eric Bennett April 13, 2018

Re-posted from https://www.chronicle.com/article/Dear-Humanities-Profs-We-Are/243100

Can the average humanities professor be blamed if she rises in the morning, checks the headlines, shivers, looks in the mirror, and beholds a countenance of righteous and powerless innocence? Whatever has happened politically to the United States, it’s happened in stark opposition to the values so many philosophers and English professors, historians and art historians, creative writers and interdisciplinary scholars of race, class, and gender hold dear.

We are, after all, the ones to include diverse voices on the syllabus, use inclusive language in the classroom, teach stories of minority triumph, and, in our conference papers, articles, and monographs, lay bare the ideological mechanisms that move the cranks and offices of a neoliberal economy. Since the Reagan era our classrooms have mustered their might against thoughtless bigotry, taught critical thinking, framed the plight and extolled the humanity of the disadvantaged, and denounced all patriotism that curdles into chauvinism.