Faculty Advocates profiles

Alicia Batten profile

Alicia Batten

Conrad Grebel University College Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate?

It is important for me to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate because although we have come a long way in Canada with regard to equity, there is a still much progress to be made, especially with regard to biases about gender and sexuality. I also think that we have to keep gender equity issues at the forefront because as someone whose research is primarily historical, I see how despite the advances that are made at various points in history, it is very easy for societies to return to unjust and discriminatory practices.

Jay Dolmage

Jay Dolmage

Arts Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate? 

I work and teach and research in a place — the University — that is supposed to be about equal opportunity and advancement, yet all too often it reinforces disparities and increases inaccessibility. HeForShe is just one visible way in which researchers and educators can advocate for change, can work to reshape higher education so that we do not repeat the exclusions and divisions of the past.

Corey Johnson

Corey Johnson

Applied Health Sciences Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate? 

Being a HeForShe advocate is a role I feel called to given the sacrifices that so many women have made for me to enjoy a "good" life. As the oldest child of a single mother, I watched first hand the challenges she faced as she tried to both raise her children alone with limited support and build a meaningful career. I realized at a very young age that I needed to do something so that my sister, nieces, students and colleagues might have a different - a better experience.

David Seljak

David Seljak

St. Jerome’s University Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate?

The HeForShe movement reminds us that gender inequality and sexism hurt all of us, women and men, LGBTQ, adults and children. I teach a course on Evil in the Religious Studies Department, and we study how evil can appear in every day, ordinary ways that we don’t always see: racism, sexism, colonialism, injustice, and ecological destruction.

Kristina Llewellyn

Kristina Llewellyn

Renison University College Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate?

Being a HeForShe advocate is incredibly meaningful for me because my feminist commitments are inspired by a father who is a staunch feminist ally and two sons who I want to raise as champions of gender equity. My research on the history of women educators demonstrates the effects of deep-seated gender oppression in the culture of education, but also the power of social movements to create substantive change.

Richard Myers

Richard Myers

St. Paul's University College Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate? 

I want my six-year old daughter to grow up in a world where all doors are open to her and it doesn’t occur to her to think it could be otherwise. 

Sean Peterson

Sean Peterson

Engineering Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate?

As the HeForShe Faculty Advocate in Engineering I have the opportunity to help improve the culture in STEM disciplines for the current and next generation of professionals.

I know from experience the gender bias does exist.  When I was an engineering student, my girlfriend at the time (also an engineering student) was told by one of the professors that “boys in engineering are here (hand held high), girls are here (hand held low)”.  I want to help make sure that such ridiculous and harmful statements and opinions become a thing of the past.

Jennifer Dean.

Jennifer Dean

Environment Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate? 

The opportunity to be a HeforShe advocate is an exciting one for me. I have long researched and advocated for equal  rights and opportunities for marginalized populations including women and girls facing gender and other forms of discrimination. As a social/health geographer and planner, I am especially interested in ensuring our built environments and local communities are inclusive places with equitable access to resources across the population. As a parent of two sons and a daughter, I am motivated by the prospect of a future where respect, compassion, and equity are central societal values.

Heidi Swanson

Heidi Swanson

Science Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate?

Often when issues of gender equity are discussed in academia, people become focused on ratios and percentages. These are important, but we need to move beyond the statistics, and learn to recognize and challenge deeply ingrained norms, perceptions, and attitudes that result in inequity in our professional culture. The behaviors that disempower women are often intangible and difficult to quantify, and thus  - especially in science – experiences of inequity can be dismissed as ‘anecdotal’. I am a HeForShe advocate because I want to honour and build on past efforts, and because of the opportunity to catalyze deeper change.

Raouf Boutaba

Raouf Boutaba

Math Faculty Advocate

Why is it important to you to be a HeForShe Faculty Advocate?

The advancement of Gender equality is an important cause. I want to do my part advocating for equality and taking action against negative stereotypes.