Photo of Bhashyam Balaji
Group(s): 
Associates
519 888 4567 ext. 53038
Location: 
QNC 2208, DC 1310
Group(s): 
Associates
Photo of David Kribs
519-824-4120 ext. 53038
Location: 
QNC 4116

David Kribs obtained his PhD in Pure Mathematics from the University of Waterloo. He was then awarded an NSERC postdoctoral fellowship and held visiting positions at the University of Iowa, Purdue University, Lancaster University and the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC). In 2003 he took  a position in the Department of Mathematics & Statistics at the University of Guelph, where he is presently Professor and Chair. His current research interests are primarily in the mathematics of quantum information; with particular emphasis on quantum error correction, entanglement theory, quantum cryptography, and the connections between theoretical and experimental quantum information science. Outside of academics, he enjoys spending time with his family, reading, and playing sports, especially ice hockey.

Website: http://www.uoguelph.ca/~dkribs/

Group(s): 
Associates
Jan Kycia
519-888-4567 ext. 35177
Location: 
PHY 373

Jan Kycia's research group, the Kycia Low Temperature Group, works on the experimental investigation of quantum mechanical properties of sub-micron and micron scaled superconducting devices. In particular superconducting single electron transistors (sSETs) and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). They are focusing on gaining a better understanding of how dissipation and the environment affect the states of the devices. They also study the 1/f noise in Josephson junctions. This 1/f noise may be an intrinsic limitation to the coherence time of superconductor-based qubits.

Website: http://www.science.uwaterloo.ca/~jkycia/

Master's students:

Group(s): 
Associates
Anthony Leggett
519-888-4021

Anthony J. Leggett, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professor and Center for Advanced Study Professor of Physics, has been a faculty member at Illinois since 1983. He is widely recognized as a world leader in the theory of low-temperature physics, and his pioneering work on superfluidity was recognized by the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Russian Academy of Sciences (foreign member), and is a Fellow of the Royal Society (U.K.), the American Physical Society, and the American Institute of Physics. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Physics (U.K.). He was knighted (KBE) by Queen Elizabeth II in 2004 "for services to physics." He is also a Mike and Ophelia Lazaridis Distinguished Research Chair.

Professor Leggett has shaped the theoretical understanding of normal and superfluid helium liquids and other strongly coupled superfluids. He set directions for research in the quantum physics of macroscopic dissipative systems and use of condensed systems to test the foundations of quantum mechanics. His research interests lie mainly within the fields of theoretical condensed matter physics and the foundations of quantum mechanics. He has been particularly interested in the possibility of using special condensed-matter systems, such as Josephson devices, to test the validity of the extrapolation of the quantum formalism to the macroscopic level; this interest has led to a considerable amount of technical work on the application of quantum mechanics to collective variables and in particular on ways of incorporating dissipation into the calculations. He is also interested in the theory of superfluid liquid 3He, especially under extreme nonequilibrium conditions, in high-temperature superconductivity, and in the newly realized system of Bose-condensed atomic gases.

Research Interests:
  • Theoretical Condensed Matter of Physics
  • Low Temperature Phenomena
  • Quantum Fluids
  • Statistical Physics
  • Macroscopic Quantum Systems
  • Quantum Theory of Measurement
Group(s): 
Associates; Scientific Advisors
Photo of Steve MacLean
Group(s): 
Associates
Photo of Eduardo Martin-Martinez
519-888-4567 ext. 39148
Location: 
MC 6447

There is strongly increasing interest in understanding entanglement and quantum communication in curved spacetimes, and in using quantum information techniques to address questions in gravity and quantum field theory. The new and very active field of relativistic quantum information was recently born to address these questions and it is set to continue developing at this fast pace during the next decade due to continued input from Earth-bound and from projected satellite-based experiments on spacetime curvature, gravitational waves and relativistic aspects of quantum entanglement.

Eduardo’s research combine the fields of quantum information science, quantum field theory and general relativity; studying quantum effects induced by gravity from the perspective of quantum information to gain information about the spacetime structure. This approach has a wide range of potential outcomes and applications from quantum computing technology to the basic physics of the question of how the spacetime curvature and quantum theory impact the flow and the processing of information.

Eduardo completed his PhD in Theoretical Physics in 2011 at the UCM (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain) with “summa cum laude” and receiving the "2010-2011 extraordinary PhD thesis award". During his PhD period he collaborated with top scientists in relativistic quantum information in Canada, United Kingdom, Austria, Japan and Poland. In 2012 he moved to the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo for his first postdoctoral appointment. In October 2012 he was awarded the prestigious Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship. He was also an associate postdoctoral researcher at Perimeter institute.

In 2014 Eduardo was named a Research Assistant Professor at the Institute for Quantum Computing, cross-appointed to the Perimeter Institute. Soon afterward, he was awarded the prestigious John Charles Polanyi Prize for Physics.

In July 2016 Eduardo was appointed Assistant Professor in the department of Applied Mathematics at the University of Waterloo, becoming an IQC Associate and a Perimeter institute Affiliate. In July 2020 Eduardo was granted tenure and promoted to Associate Professor.

Websites:

PhD students:

Master's student:

Group(s): 
Associates
Photo of Gerardo Ortiz
812-855-0367

Gerardo Ortiz is in the Physics Department at the University of Indiana in Bloomington and also an affiliate member with the Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

The quest to explore the ultimate limits and principles of quantum physics is out there. Quantum technologies are no longer a theorist's dream. For example, commercial quantum cryptography devices have become available. Ortiz is interested in studying foundational, software, and hardware aspects of quantum computation and information. Because of the exciting recent development of new algorithms, such as Shor's factoring and Grover's quantum search, that solve difficult problems on a quantum computer using algorithms that would be impractical on a classical computer, it is easy to overlook the fact that Feynman's original proposal for quantum computers was for the purpose of solving quantum physics problems.

Simulation of physical phenomena using quantum devices is one of his areas of research. He is also concerned with topics of potential overlap between his two research disciplines, where feedback from one field may help to resolve significant problems in the other. After all, a quantum computer is a quantum many-body system. What are the concepts from quantum information that one can use to study or predict phenomena in condensed matter physics? Similarly, what concepts can be borrowed from condensed matter to quantify measures of information? These are fundamental open questions. Designing and building a quantum computer or a quantum simulator is a ultimate example of topics that meet the boundaries of both disciplines. Cold atom physics is another.

Group(s): 
Associates
Joel Wallman
519-888-4567 x39071
Group(s): 
Associates
Photo of Zbigniew Wasilewski
Group(s): 
Associates
Photo of Gregor Weihs
Group(s): 
Associates
Photo of Frank K. Wilhelm-Mauch

Frank Wilhelm studied physics at the University of Karlsruhe in Germany, where he obtained his Vordiplom (B.S.) in 1993, Diplom (MS) in 1996, and Doctorate in 1999.

His thesis research was in condensed matter theory in the group of G. Schoen, studying superconducting nanodevices.

He started working on quantum computing in 1999, when he joined the experimental physics group of J.E. Mooij in what is now known as the Kavli institute for Nanoscience at the Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in the Netherlands. Still being a theorist, he moved to the Ludwig Maximillian University (LMU) of Munich in 2001, where he obtained the Habilitation and was appointed lecturer in 2004. In 2006, he joined the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada as an Associate Professor of Physics at the Institute for Quantum Computing, with a cross-appointment to Electrical and Computer Engineering, where he was promoted to full professor in 2011. He became a full chair professor at Saarland University in Germany in 2011.

Research Expertise
  • Quantum computing with superconducting nanocircuits
  • Decoherence theory
  • Circuit QED
  • Control theory
  • Quantum noise
  • Mesoscopic physics and nanodevices
  • Nonequilibrium quantum statistics
Degrees
  • Habilitation, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, 2004
  • Doctorate, Universität Karlsruhe, Germany, 1999
  • Masters, Universität Karlsruhe, Germany, 1996
  • Bachelor, Universität Karlsruhe, Germany, 1993
Major Positions Title Location When Chair professor Saarland University in Germany 2011-present Associate Professor Department of Physics and IQC, University of Waterloo 2006-2011 Senior researcher and lecturer LMU Munich 2001-2005 Postdoctoral Fellow TU Delft, Netherlands 1999-2001
Group(s): 
Associates