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Events - February 2014

Thursday, February 27, 2014 — 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM EST

Gianluigi Catelani, Peter Grünberg Institute, Germany

Superconducting qubits based on Josephson junctions are a promising
platform for quantum computation, reaching quality factors of over one
million. Such high quality factors enable the investigation of
decoherence mechanisms with high accuracy. An intrinsic decoherence
process originates from the coupling between the qubit degree of freedom
and the quasiparticles that tunnel across Josephson junctions. In this
talk I will review the general theory of quasiparticle effects, valid

Tuesday, February 25, 2014 — 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EST

Taehyun Yoon, Columbia University

In the XENON dark matter search experiment, trace contamination of Xe by Kr contributes background events through the beta decay of radioactive Kr-85. To achieve the required sensitivity of the detector, the contamination must be reduced below the part per trillion (ppt) level and this level must be known precisely. We have developed an atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) device using standard atom cooling and trapping techniques to detect Kr below the ppt level.

Monday, February 24, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EST

H. Jeff Kimble, California Institute of Technology

Friday, February 21, 2014 — 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EST

Rob Spekkens & Matthew Pusey

- Perimeter Institute

1) How to experimentally test the notion of noncontextuality

Rob Spekkens

2) How to demonstrate contextuality in a realistic experiment

Matthew Pusey

Thursday, February 13, 2014 — 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM EST

Penghui Yao (Centre for Quantum Technologies, Singapore)

A fundamental question in complexity theory is how much resource is
needed to solve k independent instances of a problem compared to the
resource required to solve one instance. Suppose solving one instance of
a problem with probability of correctness p, we require c units of some
resource in a given model of computation. A direct sum theorem states
that in order to compute k independent instances of a problem, it

Monday, February 3, 2014 — 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM EST

Jared B. Hertzberg, University of Maryland

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