Thursday, June 26, 2014 — 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM EDT

Ramy El Ganainy, Michigan Technological University

Quantum physics is playing an ever increasing role in several interdisciplinary research fields. In this presentation, I will show how some of the elementary mathematics of quantum mechanics can be used to synthesize classical photonic structures having novel functionalities.

Monday, June 23, 2014 (all day) to Friday, June 27, 2014 (all day)

A conference to celebrate the work of Chris Godsil

It is surprising that the characteristic polynomial of the adjacency matrix of a graph provides a useful window onto combinatorial properties of the graph itself, but this approach to graph theory has been a source of interesting and useful results for over 80 years.

Thursday, June 19, 2014 — 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM EDT

Martin Roetteler,  NEC Laboratories America

Recently, quantum circuits that are composed of unitary as well as probabilistic elements were employed for quantum synthesis and compilation tasks. In some cases, RUS designs led to implementations that on average are more efficient than the previously best known solutions based on unitary circuit designs. I will highlight some of the developments that are related to the synthesis of single-qubit operations and to the implementation of integer arithmetic on a quantum computer.

Thursday, June 19, 2014 — 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM EDT

Yaoyun Shi, University of Michigan

How can one be certain that the output of an alleged random
number generator is indeed random? This question is important not
only for the efficiency and the security of information
processing, but also for understanding how intrinsically
unpredictable events are possible in Nature. Practical random
number generators have often been found to be insecure. All
existing theoretical solutions require a certain form of
independence among two or more sources of randomness, a condition

Wednesday, June 18, 2014 — 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EDT

Katanya Kuntz,  University of New South Wales, Canberra, Australia

We simultaneously generate photon-subtracted squeezed vacuum and squeezed vacuum at three frequencies from an optical parametric oscillator by utilizing its frequency non-degenerate sidebands. Quantum non-Gaussianity is demonstrated by applying a novel character witness.

Tuesday, June 17, 2014 — 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM EDT

The lecturer will be Phil Kaye, a 2006 IQC graduate currently working at the Government of Canada. This lecture will be more informal and will focus on Phil's career path, how his PhD prepared him for his current position, and the challenges of working outside of academia.

For futher questions, please contact Corey Rae, IQC GSA President, crmcrae@uwaterloo.ca

Monday, June 16, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Carl A. Miller, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA

Recently Yaoyun Shi and I gave the first proof of security for robust exponential quantum randomness expansion. This talk will be an overview of the problem and a discussion of the techniques used in our proof.

Monday, June 9, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Laura Mancinska, Centre for Quantum Technologies, Singapore

Thursday, June 5, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Ivette Fuentes, The University of Nottingham

Monday, June 2, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Sevag Gharibian, University of California, Berkeley

The study of ground spaces of local Hamiltonians is a fundamental task
in condensed matter physics. In terms of computational complexity
theory, a common focus in this area has been to estimate a given
Hamiltonian’s ground state energy. However, from a physics
perspective, it is often more relevant to understand the structure of
the ground space itself. In this paper, we pursue the latter direction
by introducing the notion of “ground state connectivity” of local

Monday, May 26, 2014 (all day) to Friday, June 6, 2014 (all day)

The Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP) is a two-week program on the theoretical and experimental study of quantum information aimed primarily at students completing their third undergraduate year. The lectures and experiments are geared toward students in engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics and computer science, though all interested students are invited to apply.

S M T W T F S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
  1. 2021 (53)
    1. December (3)
    2. November (7)
    3. October (5)
    4. September (3)
    5. August (4)
    6. July (4)
    7. June (5)
    8. May (3)
    9. April (4)
    10. March (5)
    11. February (4)
    12. January (6)
  2. 2020 (31)
    1. December (2)
    2. November (5)
    3. October (4)
    4. September (3)
    5. August (2)
    6. June (4)
    7. April (1)
    8. March (3)
    9. February (5)
    10. January (2)
  3. 2019 (139)
  4. 2018 (142)
  5. 2017 (131)
  6. 2016 (88)
  7. 2015 (82)
  8. 2014 (94)
    1. December (5)
    2. November (4)
    3. October (13)
    4. September (8)
    5. August (4)
    6. July (9)
    7. June (11)
    8. May (7)
    9. April (12)
    10. March (10)
    11. February (7)
    12. January (5)
  9. 2013 (91)
  10. 2012 (122)
  11. 2011 (117)
  12. 2010 (41)
  13. 2009 (4)
  14. 2008 (1)
  15. 2005 (1)
  16. 2004 (3)