Monday, September 22, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:25 PM EDT

Darrick Chang, The Institute of Photonic Sciences

Significant efforts have been made to interface cold atoms with micro- and nano-photonic systems in recent years. Originally, it was envisioned
that the migration to these systems from free-space atomic ensemble or

Monday, September 15, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT
Birgitta Whaley

K. Birgitta Whaley,
University of California, Berkeley

What role does Quantum Mechanics play in Biology?

Monday, September 8, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Joonyeon Chang, Korea Institute for Science and Technology

Monday, September 8, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Spin controlled electronic devices for the next generation electronics

Thursday, September 4, 2014 — 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EDT

Chang Liu, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Thursday, August 14, 2014 — 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM EDT

Erika Andersson, Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences Heriot-Watt University

Tuesday, August 12, 2014 — 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM EDT

Electra Eleftheriadou, University of Strathclyde

In practical applications of communication schemes it is often necessary to amplify the transmitted signals. Because of the intrinsic noise due to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, a quantum signal requires an amplification process which is different than the one used for classical signals.

Thursday, August 7, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Feihu Xu, University of Toronto

In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD. This gap has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities.


Friday, August 1, 2014 — 1:00 PM EDT
Monday, July 28, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:25 PM EDT

Jérémie Roland - Université Libre de Bruxelles

Monday, July 28, 2014 — 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM EDT

Gregor Weihs, Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Innsbruck

For fundamental tests of quantum physics as well as for quantum communications non-classical states of light are an important tool. In our research we focus on developing semiconductor-based and integrated sources of single photons and entangled photon pairs.

Thursday, July 24, 2014 — 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EDT

Genda Gu, Brookhaven National Laboratory

Abstract

Monday, July 21, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Alexander Szameit, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

Thursday, July 17, 2014 — 3:00 PM EDT

Quantum algorithms exponentially faster than their classical equivalents exist for code breaking, quantum chemistry, knot theory, group theory, and are speculated to exist for diverse applications including machine learning and artificial intelligence. I review these applications and the current state of knowledge on how to build a practical quantum computer.

Thursday, July 17, 2014 — 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM EDT

Sergey Bravyi, IBM Research

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 — 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM EDT

Karol Zyczkowski, Jagellonian University

A pure quantum state of N subsystems with d levels each is called
k-uniform, if all its reductions to k qudits are maximally mixed.
These states form a natural generalization of N-qudits GHZ states
which belong to the class 1-uniform states.

Monday, July 7, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Dominique Unruh, University of Tartu

Position verification allows us to verify the position of a device in space (e.g., for enabling access to location based services). Unfortunately, position verification is known to be insecure in principle using only classical cryptography. We show how position verification can be achieved using quantum communication.

Thursday, July 3, 2014 — 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM EDT

Robin Kothari

I will talk about a classic lemma due to Jordan (1875) that is
frequently used in quantum computing.  Jordan's lemma says that given
any two orthogonal projectors, there is a way to partition the
underlying vector space into 1- and 2-dimensional subspaces that are
invariant under the action of both projectors.  This simple lemma has
applications in several areas of quantum computing.  In this talk will
discuss the lemma, its proof, and explain some selected applications in

Thursday, June 26, 2014 — 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM EDT

Ramy El Ganainy, Michigan Technological University

Quantum physics is playing an ever increasing role in several interdisciplinary research fields. In this presentation, I will show how some of the elementary mathematics of quantum mechanics can be used to synthesize classical photonic structures having novel functionalities.

Monday, June 23, 2014 (all day) to Friday, June 27, 2014 (all day)

A conference to celebrate the work of Chris Godsil

It is surprising that the characteristic polynomial of the adjacency matrix of a graph provides a useful window onto combinatorial properties of the graph itself, but this approach to graph theory has been a source of interesting and useful results for over 80 years.

Thursday, June 19, 2014 — 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM EDT

Martin Roetteler,  NEC Laboratories America

Recently, quantum circuits that are composed of unitary as well as probabilistic elements were employed for quantum synthesis and compilation tasks. In some cases, RUS designs led to implementations that on average are more efficient than the previously best known solutions based on unitary circuit designs. I will highlight some of the developments that are related to the synthesis of single-qubit operations and to the implementation of integer arithmetic on a quantum computer.

Thursday, June 19, 2014 — 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM EDT

Yaoyun Shi, University of Michigan

How can one be certain that the output of an alleged random
number generator is indeed random? This question is important not
only for the efficiency and the security of information
processing, but also for understanding how intrinsically
unpredictable events are possible in Nature. Practical random
number generators have often been found to be insecure. All
existing theoretical solutions require a certain form of
independence among two or more sources of randomness, a condition

Wednesday, June 18, 2014 — 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EDT

Katanya Kuntz,  University of New South Wales, Canberra, Australia

We simultaneously generate photon-subtracted squeezed vacuum and squeezed vacuum at three frequencies from an optical parametric oscillator by utilizing its frequency non-degenerate sidebands. Quantum non-Gaussianity is demonstrated by applying a novel character witness.

Tuesday, June 17, 2014 — 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM EDT

The lecturer will be Phil Kaye, a 2006 IQC graduate currently working at the Government of Canada. This lecture will be more informal and will focus on Phil's career path, how his PhD prepared him for his current position, and the challenges of working outside of academia.

For futher questions, please contact Corey Rae, IQC GSA President, crmcrae@uwaterloo.ca

Monday, June 16, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Carl A. Miller, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA

Recently Yaoyun Shi and I gave the first proof of security for robust exponential quantum randomness expansion. This talk will be an overview of the problem and a discussion of the techniques used in our proof.

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