Monday, June 9, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Laura Mancinska, Centre for Quantum Technologies, Singapore

Thursday, June 5, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Ivette Fuentes, The University of Nottingham

Monday, June 2, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Sevag Gharibian, University of California, Berkeley

The study of ground spaces of local Hamiltonians is a fundamental task
in condensed matter physics. In terms of computational complexity
theory, a common focus in this area has been to estimate a given
Hamiltonian’s ground state energy. However, from a physics
perspective, it is often more relevant to understand the structure of
the ground space itself. In this paper, we pursue the latter direction
by introducing the notion of “ground state connectivity” of local

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 — 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM EDT

Sahel Ashhab, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation

Cavity QED in the ultrastrong-coupling regime & Landau-Zaner-Stückelberg interfereometry

Monday, May 26, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Xiaodong Xu, The University of Washington

Monday, May 26, 2014 (all day) to Friday, June 6, 2014 (all day)

The Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP) is a two-week program on the theoretical and experimental study of quantum information aimed primarily at students completing their third undergraduate year. The lectures and experiments are geared toward students in engineering, physics, chemistry, mathematics and computer science, though all interested students are invited to apply.

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 — 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM EDT

David Elkouss, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

"Quantum key distribution performs the trick of growing a secret key in two distant places connected by a quantum channel. In practical systems, whether because of finite resources or external conditions, the quantum channel is subject to fluctuations. A rate adaptive information reconciliation protocol, that adapts to the changes in the communication channel, is then required to minimize the leakage of information in the classical postprocessing.

Monday, May 12, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Omar Fawzi, McGill University

The goal of two-party cryptography is to enable Alice and Bob to solve tasks in cooperation even if they do not trust each other. Examples of such tasks include bit commitment, coin flipping and oblivious transfer. Unfortunately, it has been shown that even using quantum communication, none of these tasks can be implemented when the adversary is completely general.

Tuesday, May 6, 2014 — 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM EDT

IQC presents the first in a series of lectures from members of industry in quantum computing and quantum information. Jonathan Hodges, VP of engineering for Diamond Nanotechnologies, will be speaking about his research as well as the day-to-day realities of working in industry. You can learn more about the company here: http://www.diamondnanotechnologies.com/

Monday, May 5, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

David P. Pappas, NIST

Monday, April 28, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Raul Garcia-Patron, Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik

Monday, April 28, 2014 — 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM EDT

Magdalena Stobinska, University of Gdańsk/Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw

We discuss a device capable of filtering out two-mode states of light with mode populations differing by more than a certain threshold, while not revealing which mode is more populated. It would allow engineering of macroscopic quantum states of light in a way which is preserving specific superpositions. As a result, it would enhance optical phase estimation with these states. We propose an optical scheme, which is a relatively simple, albeit non-ideal, operational implementation of such a filter.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014 — 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM EDT

Michael Hilke, McGill University

Monday, April 21, 2014 — 1:00 PM EDT

Takashi Imai, McMaster University

NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) is a versatile probe of condensed matter, and has a broad range of applications in chemistry, medicine (MRI), oil industry, etc. NMR has become so popular outside the conventional realm of physics that the crucial role NMR has been playing in condensed matter physics is sometimes overlooked. I will explain how condensed matter physicists use NMR as a powerful low energy probe of solids, drawing examples from modern research into statistical physics, magnetism, and superconductivity.

Thursday, April 17, 2014 — 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EDT

Amir Jafari-Salim, IQC

Thursday, April 17, 2014 — 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM EDT

Robin Kothari

We provide a quantum algorithm for simulating the
dynamics of sparse Hamiltonians with complexity sublogarithmic in
the inverse error, an exponential improvement over previous methods.
Unlike previous approaches based on product formulas, the query
complexity is independent of the number of qubits acted on, and for
time-varying Hamiltonians, the gate complexity is logarithmic in the
norm of the derivative of the Hamiltonian. Our algorithm is based on
a significantly improved simulation of the continuous- and

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 — 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM EDT

Joseph F. Traub, Columbia University

We introduce the notion of strong quantum speedup. To compute this
speedup one must know the classical computational complexity. What is it about the problems of quantum physics and quantum chemistry that enable us to get lower bounds on the classical complexity?

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 — 10:30 AM EDT

Volkher Scholz, Institute for Theoretical Physics ETH Zurich

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 — 11:00 AM EDT

Jingyun Fan, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Monday, April 7, 2014 — 2:30 PM EDT

Fernando Pastawski, California Institute of Technology

Monday, April 7, 2014 — 1:00 PM EDT

Layla Hormozi, National University of Ireland

Wednesday, April 2, 2014 — 7:00 PM EDT

The Institute for Quantum Computing's (IQC) Grad Student Association  is screening the 7 Academy Award winning movie Gravity on April 2nd at 7 pm. The event will be followed by a short presentation and Q&A with IQC's  associate member, astronaut, and former Canadian Space Agency president Steve MacLean.

Monday, March 31, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Dr. Jianming Cai, Universität Ulm

Color centers are atomic defects in diamond that possess electronic and nuclear spins.
The rapid progress of experiments with color centers in diamond indicates that
they are promising systems for quantum information processing, and more important for quantum
sensing (imaging) under ambient conditions.

Monday, March 31, 2014 — 11:00 AM to 12:20 PM EDT

Michael Reimer, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands

 

Monday, March 24, 2014 — 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM EDT

Francois Le Gall, The University of Tokyo

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