Monday, March 28, 2016 — 11:00 AM EDT

Bottom-up approaches for quantum many-body physics with cold trapped atoms

Crystal Senko, Harvard University

A major outstanding challenge in quantum science is the development and refinement of techniques to control interactions among quantum particles, which will be a key ingredient in quantum information processing and laboratory studies of quantum many-body physics. This talk will describe two atom-based platforms for studying artificial spin-spin interactions.

Thursday, March 24, 2016 — 1:30 PM EDT

Quantum information processing with superconducting quantum circuits

Archana Kamal, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The promise of quantum computers to solve problems intractable with their best classical counterparts has catapulted quantum information processing into a major research effort in recent years. In addition, rapidly evolving capabilities in manipulating quantum systems have provided us with new insights into the dynamics of nature at small scales. One of the primary challenges in developing any practical quantum information platform, however, is to harness quantum effects on macroscopic scales.

Monday, March 21, 2016 — 2:30 PM EDT

Hybrid quantum systems using collective degrees of freedom in solids

Yasunobu Nakamura, The University of Tokyo

In the course of the development of superconducting qubits, we learned that we can fully control quantum states of selected collective degrees of freedom in superconducting circuits. Such collective modes, rigidly extending in a macroscopic scale, strongly couple to electromagnetic fields via their large dipole moments. Moreover, Josephson junctions bring large nonlinearity into the system without adding dissipation.

Thursday, March 10, 2016 — 2:00 PM EST

Quantum optics of strongly correlated many-body systems

Igor Mekhov, University of Oxford

We show that quantum backaction of weak measurement constitutes a novel source of competitions in many-body systems, thus leading to new phenomena. We consider a system of ultracold atoms in optical lattices trapped inside a high-Q cavity, which requires a fully quantum description of both light and matter waves. The QND measurements lead to the generation of genuinely multipartite entangled modes of the matter fields, which have analogies in quantum optics (e.g. two-mode squeezing), but are non-Gaussian.

Wednesday, March 9, 2016 — 10:30 AM EST

Quantum Randomness Expansion - New Results

Carl Miller, University of Michigan

Is it possible to create a source of provable random numbers? An affirmative answer to this question would be highly useful in information security, where random numbers are needed to provide the keys for encryption algorithms. Bell inequality violation experiments offer hope for this problem, since the outputs of a Bell violation must be non-classical and therefore not fully predictable to an adversary. The challenge is to prove something stronger: that the outputs can be processed (extracted) to obtain uniformly random data. This leads to some complex and beautiful mathematics.

Thursday, October 15, 2015 — 10:00 AM EDT to Friday, March 11, 2016 — 4:00 PM EST
LIGHT Illuminated graphic including list of sponsors

Celebrating light and light-based technologies

LIGHT Illuminated celebrates the United Nation's International Year of Light. In this interactive exhibition at THEMUSEUM you can learn about the value and importance of light-based technologies by exploring a black-light room, playing with colour mixing stations, and trying to get through a laser maze.

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