Tuesday, August 8, 2017 — 9:30 AM EDT
Christopher Pugh

Christopher Pugh of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is presenting his thesis:

Free Space Quantum Key Distribution to Moving Platforms

Christopher is supervised by IQC faculty member Thomas Jennewein.

Thursday, August 3, 2017 — 11:00 AM EDT
Helen Percival

Helen Percival of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is presenting her thesis:

Characterization of Lambda Systems Using Superconducting Qubits

Helen is supervised by IQC faculty member Christopher Wilson.

Monday, July 31, 2017 — 2:30 PM EDT

Colloquium featuring Heejeong Jeong - Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Optical precursors are transient electromagnetic wave packets propagating precisely at the speed of light in vacuum through a dispersive and absorptive dielectric. Even though its existence was conjectured by Sommerfeld and Brillouin 100 years ago, the detection seemed to be impossible due to its exceedingly small amplitude and femtosecond time scale in ordinary linear dispersive media. 

Friday, July 28, 2017 — 12:00 PM EDT
Allison Sachs

Allison Sachs of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is defending her thesis:

Entanglement Harvesting and Divergences in Unruh-DeWitt Detector Pairs

Allison is supervised by IQC associates Robert Mann and Eduardo Martin-Martinez.

Friday, July 28, 2017 — 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM EDT

Dimensionality-driven orthorhombic MoTe2 at room temperature.

Joey Zhong

Thursday, July 27, 2017 — 3:00 PM to 8:00 PM EDT
The Quantum Mechanics logo

Come play in The Quantum Mechanics Golf Tournament and join the fight against cancer

The Quantum Mechanics are asking for your support in the fight against cancer.

The team, made of University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) and Perimeter Institute members, is participating in the Grand Ride in honour of Pearl Sullivan, Dean of Engineering and Raymond Laflamme, Executive Director of IQC at the University of Waterloo and all those in our communities who have been touched by cancer.

Thursday, July 27, 2017 — 10:00 AM EDT
Paulina Corona Ugalde

Paulina Corona Ugalde of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is defending her thesis:

Experimental Prospects for Detecting the Quantum Nature of Spacetime

Paulina is supervised by IQC associate Robert Mann

Wednesday, July 26, 2017 (all day) to Friday, July 28, 2017 (all day)
Wome in Physics Canada logo

The Women in Physics Canada (WIPC) conference, hosted by the University of Waterloo, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics & Astronomy and the Institute for Quantum Computing, will bring together early career scientists to present their research and hear plenary talks from leaders in physics.

We welcome attendance by people of all genders.

Register

Monday, July 24, 2017 — 2:30 PM EDT

Peter Høyer - University of Calgary
 

We give a framework for studying arbitrary quantum operators that are being controlled by an ancilla. We show that controlled quantum operators can be used for searching. Controlled quantum operators can simulate existing search methods such as Grover's algorithm, amplitude amplification, quantum interpolated walks, and Szegedy's and Ambainis's quantum walks.

Friday, July 14, 2017 — 11:45 AM EDT

Efficient quantum memory in naturally trapped Rare-Earth ions

Mahmood Sabooni, IQC

The ability to map, store quantum states of light (e. g. single photon) to matter and later retrieve is one of the important building blocks of quantum information processing. Such a device is called a quantum memory for light.

Thursday, June 29, 2017 — 2:00 PM EDT

Characterizing drift qubits

Timothy Proctor, Sandia National Laboratories

It is essential to benchmark and characterize real-world qubits in order to understand whether they are of sufficient quality for quantum information tasks, and if they are not, so that they can be debugged. Many techniques are designed for qubits that stay constant in time, but in reality almost all qubits suffer from some form of time-dependence.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017 — 2:00 PM EDT

Constraint Propagation Games

Zhengfeng Ji, University of Technology, Sydney

Constraint propagation games are simple extended nonlocal games that are motivated by the propagation checking of quantum computation and have found powerful applications in the study of quantum proof systems recently. In this talk, we will introduce their definitions and basic properties, demonstrate their uses in larger games as building blocks, and illustrate the method that turns them into nonlocal games.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017 — 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM EDT

This is the tenth and final of the Intellectual Property (IP) Management Lunch and Learn Lecture Series. We are bringing in thought leaders in the protection and management of intellectual property, including many years of experience in relevant areas of information technology.

This session will be led by Neil Henderson and Tom Hunter.

Monday, June 26, 2017 — 2:30 PM EDT

Complexity of quantum impurity models

Sergey Bravyi, IBM Research

I will discuss classical and quantum algorithms for simulation of quantum impurity models. Such models describe a bath of free fermions coupled to a small interacting subsystem called an impurity. Hamiltonians of this form were famously studied by Anderson, Kondo, Wilson and others in 1960s.

Friday, June 16, 2017 — 2:00 PM EDT

Scaling up single-atom spin qubits in silicon

Andrea Morello, Centre for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology, University of New South Wales

The modern information era is built on silicon nanoelectronic devices. The future quantum information era might be built on silicon too, if we succeed in controlling the interactions between individual spins hosted in silicon nanostructures.

Spins in silicon constitute excellent solid-state qubits, because of the weak spin-orbit coupling and the possibility to remove nuclear spins from the environment through 28Si isotopic enrichment.

Thursday, June 15, 2017 — 2:00 PM EDT

Mode-selection, purification, and ultrafast manipulation of quantum light with nonlinear waveguide devices

John Donohue, University of Paderborn

The temporal structure of quantum light offers an intrinsically high-dimensional and robust platform for encoding quantum information. In particular, the time-frequency degree of freedom can be explored in the frame of pulsed temporal modes, the ultrafast analogy to spatial Hermite-Gauss or orbital angular momentum modes. These overlapping temporal modes are naturally compatible with waveguide devices and fibre infrastructure, but present unique challenges to fully explore and exploit.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017 — 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM EDT

This is the ninth of the Intellectual Property (IP) Management Lunch and Learn Lecture Series. We are bringing in thought leaders in the protection and management of intellectual property, including many years of experience in relevant areas of information technology.

The speaker for this session is to be determined.

Monday, June 12, 2017 — 2:30 PM EDT

Chernoff Bound for Quantum Operations is Faithful

Nengkun Yu, Tsinghua University & University of Technology, Sydney

We consider the problem of testing two quantum hypotheses of quantum operations in the setting of many uses where an arbitrary prior distribution is given. The concept of the Chernoff bound for quantum operations is investigated to track the minimal average probability of error of discriminating two quantum operations asymptotically.

Monday, June 5, 2017 — 2:30 PM EDT

Sequential measurements, disturbance and property testing

Aram Harrow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

We describe two procedures which, given access to one copy of a quantum state and a sequence of two-outcome measurements, can distinguish between the case that at least one of the measurements accepts the state with high probability, and the case that all of the measurements have low probability of acceptance.

Friday, June 2, 2017 — 11:45 AM EDT

Simulation of III-V Nanowires for Infrared Photodetection

Khalifa M. Azizur-Rahman, McMaster University

The absorptance in vertical nanowire (nw) arrays is typically dominated by three optical phenomena: radial mode resonances, near-field evanescent wave coupling, and Fabry–Perot (F-P) mode resonances. The contribution of these optical phenomena to GaAs, InP and InAs nw absorptance was simulated using the finite element method. The study compared the absorptance between finite and semi-infinite nws with varying geometrical parameters, including the nw diameter (D), array period (P), and nw length (L).

Thursday, June 1, 2017 — 2:00 PM EDT

Existence and Uniqueness in the Quantum Marginal Problem

Joel Klassen, IQC

The quantum marginal problem asks whether a family of quantum marginals are compatible with a global quantum state. It is of central importance to a wide range of topics in both quantum many body physics and quantum information. Often it can be the case that when a family of quantum marginals are compatible with a global quantum state, that global state is unique.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 — 2:00 PM EDT

Superconducting Resonator with Composite Film for Quantum Information

Edward Tang, IQC

The full manipulation of a quantum system can endow us with the power of computing in exponentially increased state space without exponential growth of physical resources. In this thesis, we are dedicated to the developments in superconducting devices and layout design for their future applications in large-scale quantum computation.

Monday, May 29, 2017 (all day) to Friday, June 9, 2017 (all day)
USEQIP logo

Join us at the Institute for Quantum Computing for a two-week introduction to the theoretical and experimental study of quantum information processing.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017 — 2:30 PM EDT

Many-Body Localization Through the Lens of Ultracold Quantum Gases

Pranjal Bordia, Max Planck Institute, Munich

A fundamental assumption of quantum statistical mechanics is that closed isolated systems always thermalize under their own dynamics. Progress on the topic of many-body localization has challenged this vital assumption, describing a phase where thermalization, and with it, equilibrium thermodynamics, breaks down.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 — 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM EDT

This is the eighth of the Intellectual Property (IP) Management Lunch and Learn Lecture Series. We are bringing in thought leaders in the protection and management of intellectual property, including many years of experience in relevant areas of information technology.

This session will be led by Dr. Douglas Beynon.

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