October 2016

Wednesday, October 5, 2016 — 2:30 PM EDT
Razieh Annabestani

Razieh Annabestani of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is defending his thesis:

Collective Dynamics in NMR and Quantum Noise

Razieh is supervised by Professor David Cory.

Friday, October 14, 2016 — 11:45 AM to 1:00 PM EDT

Title TBA

If you're coming from the Lazaridis Centre, take the 11:35am shuttle from QNC to RAC1, and they can return to QNC from RAC1 @ 1:15pm.

A light lunch will be provided.

Saturday, October 15, 2016 — 11:30 AM EDT

What is quantum? Join us for the Qubit Club at THEMUSEUM to learn all about quantum with some fun and exciting science demonstrations!

Saturday, October 15, 2016 — 2:30 PM EDT

What is quantum? Join us for the Qubit Club at THEMUSEUM to learn all about quantum with some fun and exciting science demonstrations!

Monday, October 17, 2016 — 11:45 AM EDT

Extended nonlocal games from quantum-classical

Vincent Russo, IQC

Several variants of nonlocal games have been considered in the study of quantum entanglement and nonlocality. In this talk, we shall consider two such variants called quantum-classical games and extended nonlocal games. The players, Alice and Bob, may play the game according to various classes of strategies. An entangled strategy is one in which Alice and Bob use quantum resources in the form of a shared quantum state and sets of measurements. One may ask whether the dimension of the shared state makes a difference in how well the players can perform using an entangled strategy.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016 — 6:30 PM EDT

Come get your nerd on and learn about the world of physics with Nerd Nite KW! They will take you through quantum 101, and then see if you were paying attention with some friendly rounds of trivia. Aspiring scientists and experts alike are welcome. Special guest speaker Dr. Shohini Ghose, an Associate Professor of Physics and Computer Science and Director of the Centre for Women in Science at Wilfrid Laurier University in Canada, will also be giving a presentation. Make sure to also check out QUANTUM: The Exhibition while you're there.

Sunday, October 23, 2016 (all day) to Wednesday, October 26, 2016 (all day) to Wednesday, October 26, 2016 (All day)
Quantum Innovators logo

The Quantum Innovators workshop brings together the most promising young researchers in quantum physics and engineering. Guests are invited for a four-day workshop aimed at exploring the frontier of our field.

Monday, October 24, 2016 — 11:45 AM to 12:46 PM EDT

Perfect embezzlement of entanglement

Monday, October 24, 2016 — 3:00 PM EDT

Practical continuous variable quantum communication in fibre and free space systems

Christoph Marquardt, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light

I will review our recent activities in continuous variable QKD that aims for the deployment of QKD equipment compatible with current telecom standards and research in satellite QKD that will make it possible to bridge long distances. In optical fibre systems continuous variable quantum cryptography reaches GHz speed and offers efficient integration with known telecommunication techniques, especially in short inner-city or data center links. Sending and receiving components, including quantum random number generators, can be efficiently built in integrated components. Optical free space communication is a reliable means to transmit classical and quantum information. Free space links offer ad-hoc establishment in intra-city communication, air-to-ground or satellite-to-ground scenarios.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 — 10:00 AM EDT

Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) Si quantum dots

Greg Holloway, IQC

Friday, October 28, 2016 — 11:45 AM EDT

Title TBA

If you're coming from the Lazaridis Centre, take the 11:35am shuttle from QNC to RAC1, and they can return to QNC from RAC1 @ 1:15pm.

A light lunch will be provided.

Monday, October 31, 2016 — 2:30 PM EDT

Efficient Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computing

Martin Suchara, AT&T Labs Research

Quantum error correction presents some of the most significant and interesting challenges that must be resolved before building an efficient quantum computer. Quantum error correcting codes allow to successfully run quantum algorithms on unreliable quantum hardware. Because quantum hardware suffers from errors such as decoherence, leakage or qubit loss, and these errors corrupt delicate quantum states rather than binary information, the known error correction techniques are complex and have a high overhead. 

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