University COVID-19 update

Visit the University's Coronavirus Information website for more information.

The Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology main office (QNC 3606) is closed until further notice. If you are a student trying to pick up or return a lab/office key, please email asomel@uwaterloo.ca for assistance. All other inquires can be directed to win-office@uwaterloo.ca. For emergencies, contact Campus Police.

News for Media

Friday, November 20, 2020

How math is revolutionizing medicine

Professor Anita Layton

Clinical trials in medicine are slow, expensive, and most fail. Can mathematical models help us find life-saving drugs faster and more efficiently?

Thursday, November 19, 2020

Zooming into the future of optics

Scope Photonics members (l-r) Zhenle Cao, Ishan Mishra, Holden Beggs, Alisha Bhanji and Fernando Pena pose for a group photo.

Five recent nanotechnology engineering graduates from the University of Waterloo have come a long way since they came together over a shared interest in optics and frustration with the poor quality of their smartphone photographs.

Tuesday, November 10, 2020

WIN member wins national research award

Aiping Yu

Aiping Yu, a professor of chemical engineering, is one of six nation-wide recipients of 2020 E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowships for highly promising researchers. Her selection was announced today by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. A virtual awards ceremony is scheduled for this afternoon.

Friday, November 6, 2020

WIN member wins $800K in support for COVID project

COVID-19 virus image

A researcher at Waterloo Engineering has been awarded $800,000 in federal funding to develop compostable personal protective equipment (PPE) and antimicrobial coatings to help fight COVID-19.

Michael Tam, a chemical engineering professor, hopes to produce face masks and other PPE from natural rather than synthetic materials, and develop coatings and sprays to protect PPE and high-touch surfaces from contamination by the virus.

Monday, November 2, 2020

Breakthrough frees tiny, powerful laser device from the lab

Zbig Wasilewski in lab

Researchers have created a portable version of a tiny, powerful laser device with potential applications in fields ranging from medical imaging to detecting hidden explosives.

In a project involving the University of Waterloo and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), scientists developed a quantum cascade laser capable of operating at temperatures much higher than previously possible.

  1. 2020 (38)
    1. November (6)
    2. October (7)
    3. September (1)
    4. August (2)
    5. July (2)
    6. June (6)
    7. May (1)
    8. April (5)
    9. March (1)
    10. February (3)
    11. January (4)
  2. 2019 (28)
    1. December (2)
    2. November (6)
    3. October (4)
    4. September (4)
    5. July (1)
    6. May (4)
    7. March (3)
    8. February (3)
    9. January (1)
  3. 2018 (14)
    1. December (5)
    2. November (1)
    3. October (2)
    4. September (2)
    5. June (1)
    6. March (2)
    7. February (1)
  4. 2017 (1)
  5. 2016 (4)
  6. 2015 (5)
  7. 2014 (7)
  8. 2013 (4)
  9. 2012 (8)
  10. 2011 (11)
  11. 2010 (12)
  12. 2009 (2)