University COVID-19 update

Visit the University's Coronavirus Information website for more information.

The Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology main office (QNC 3606) is closed until further notice. If you are a student trying to pick up or return a lab/office key, please email asomel@uwaterloo.ca for assistance. All other inquires can be directed to win-office@uwaterloo.ca. For emergencies, contact Campus Police.

News for Media

Friday, April 3, 2020

Nanotechnology entrepreneurs win backing in pitch events

SMRTCoat Team

At the Concept $5K Finals - formerly the Velocity Fund Finals - teams featuring nanotechnology engineering students took one of four $5,000 awards, plus the $500 People’s Champ prize, for students with business ideas.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Ontario government awards $3.4 million to Waterloo researchers for infrastructure

Twenty-nine University of Waterloo researchers, including 4 science recipients, 3 of which are members of WIN, will receive $3.4 million from the provincial government to further research innovation in Ontario. 

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

New sensor provides better leak protection in buildings

A new, battery-free sensor can detect water leaks in buildings at a fraction of the cost of existing systems.

The tiny device, developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, uses nanotechnology to power itself and send an alert to smartphones when exposed to moisture.

By eliminating a battery and related circuitry, researchers estimate their sensor could be commercially produced for $5 each, about a tenth of the cost of current leak detection devices on the market.

Friday, January 10, 2020

WIN member, Professor Yeow, elected VP of IEEE Nanotechnology Technical Council

John Yeow, a WIN member and systems design engineering professor, is the new VP of Educational Activities for the IEEE Nanotechnology Technical Council (NTC).

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Math is the new microscope

Breakthroughs in technology and computing are changing the way researchers approach medicine. Early scientists wielded the revolutionary tools of their time, such as the microscope, to understand human health. Today, researchers increasingly use math as a microscope to understand biology and medicine, dictating the need for scientists to navigate between the worlds of computations and medicine comfortably.

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