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Leaders in movement science

With the establishment of the world's first department of kinesiology, the University of Waterloo was instrumental in defining the science of human movement and continues to lead the evolution of this exciting discipline.

Through understanding the cellular to societal implications of physical activity, nutrition and lifestyle, our research, academic programs and services aim to optimize health, prevent injury and illness, and extend the years of high quality life.

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  1. Oct. 12, 2018Remembering Jay ThomsonJay Thomson.

    James A. (Jay) Thomson, professor emeritus in Waterloo’s Department of Kinesiology, passed away October 9. An expert in nutrition and the biochemistry of exercise, Thomson’s research focused on how metabolism and contractile events in skeletal muscle are affected by acid accumulation during intense work. He taught generations of kinesiology students the foundations of biochemistry, human nutrition, and adaptive physiology.

  2. Sep. 27, 2018Virtual reality motion sickness may be predicted and counteractedTwo researchers working with an individual wearing VR helmet

    Researchers at the University of Waterloo have made progress toward predicting who is likely to feel sick from virtual reality technology.

    In a recent study, the researchers found they could predict whether an individual will experience cybersickness (motion sickness caused by virtual reality) by how much they sway in response to a moving visual field. The researchers think that this knowledge will help them to develop counteractions to cybersickness.

  3. Aug. 9, 2018Exercise physiology experts dedicate research to former Kinesiology chair and AHS deanMike Sharratt

    The Journal of Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism honoured Mike Sharratt, former Kinesiology chair and Applied Health Sciences dean, by dedicating an inaugural ‘Horizon’ paper to him.

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