Magnetic Force Microscopy Characterization of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs)

TitleMagnetic Force Microscopy Characterization of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs)
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsCordova, G., S. Attwood, R. Gaikwad, F. Gu, and Z. Leonenko
JournalNano Biomedicine and Engineering
Volume6
Start Page31
Issue1
Pagination31-39
Date Published03/2014
Keywordsmagnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging in liquid, magnetic properties, MFM imaging of SPIONS in liquid and inside polymer films, silica coated SPIONs, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), surface modification for nanoparticle adsorption
Abstract

Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), due to their controllable sizes, relatively long in vivo half-life and limited agglomeration, are ideal for biomedical applications such as magnetic labeling, hyperthermia cancer treatment, targeted drug delivery and for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast enhancement agents. In order to understand how SPIONs interact with cells and cellular membranes it would be of interest to characterize individual SPIONs at the nanoscale in physiologically relevant conditions without labeling them. We demonstrate that Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) can be used to image SPIONs in air as well as in liquid. The magnetic properties of bare and SiO2 coated SPIONs are compared using MFM. We report that surface modification using (3-mercaptopropyl)-trimethoxysilane significantly improves adsorption and distribution of SPIONs on gold surfaces. To obtain proof of principle that SPIONS can be imaged with MFM inside the cell we imaged SPIONs buried in thin polymer films (polystyrene (PS) and poly methyl-methacrylate (PMMA)). This opens the possibility of visualizing SPIONs inside the cell without any labeling or modifications and present MFM as a potential magnetic analogue for fluorescence microscopy. The results of these studies may have a valuable impact for characterization and further development of biomedical applications of SPIONs and other magnetic nanoparticles.

DOI10.5101/nbe.v6i1
Refereed DesignationRefereed
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