News archive

Monday, November 30, 2015

DNA repair factor linked to breast cancer may also have implications for Alzheimer’s disease

Mutations on the breast cancer factor 1 (BRCA1) gene are linked to breast and ovarian cancer but according to a new study, low levels of normal BRCA1 protein in the brain may lead to dementia. “It’s extremely interesting that one molecule can be critically involved in two apparently opposing conditions: cancer, in which too many cells are born and neurodegenerative disease, in which too many brain cells die off,” said senior author Lennart Mucke, M.D., director of the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, and the Joseph B.

Sunday, November 29, 2015

World's first anti-aging drug to be tested in clinical trials

The world’s first anti-aging drug will be tested on human participants in trials next year that could result in individuals living till 120 years old in good health. Scientists now believe that it is possible to slow down the aging process and prevent diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. “If you target an aging process and you slow down aging then you slow down all the diseases and pathology of aging as well,” said one of the study advisers, Prof. Gordon Lithgow of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging.

Friday, November 27, 2015

Scientists have discovered how synapses are lost in early Alzheimer's disease

Researchers led by scientists from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Australia have found how connections between brain cells are damaged in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. "One of the first signs of Alzheimer's disease is the loss of synapses - the structures that connect neurons in the brain," said study leader, Dr Vladimir Sytnyk, of the UNSW School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences.

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Researching the benefits of dance for people with dementia

Baycrest Health Sciences and Canada’s National Ballet School are working in collaboration to provide dance classes to people with moderate to severe dementia living in long-term care. Researchers want to examine the effect of dance on the quality of life of people with dementia. “Your brain is really multi-tasking in dance,” said Rachel Bar, a clinical psychology doctoral student at Ryerson who is also the health initiatives and research consultant for Canada’s National Ballet School and a former professional ballerina. “You’re focusing on music, on timing, on rhythm.

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Wealthier people with dementia in England are more likely to be prescribed drugs

According to new research from University College London, people with dementia from wealthier areas in England are 27% more likely to be prescribed anti-dementia drugs than people with dementia from poorer areas. The study included 77,045 people with dementia across the United Kingdom, and this inequality was not observed in Scotland, Northern Ireland or Wales. “When access to any treatment is rationed, wealthier patients and their families tend to be better-equipped to navigate the healthcare system and get around the restrictions,” said study author Dr. Claudia Cooper.

  1. 2017 (116)
    1. October (10)
    2. September (13)
    3. August (6)
    4. July (15)
    5. June (12)
    6. May (15)
    7. April (12)
    8. March (12)
    9. February (12)
    10. January (9)
  2. 2016 (137)
    1. December (6)
    2. November (10)
    3. October (15)
    4. September (16)
    5. August (12)
    6. July (9)
    7. June (6)
    8. May (15)
    9. April (12)
    10. March (18)
    11. February (9)
    12. January (9)
  3. 2015 (122)
    1. December (5)
    2. November (13)
    3. October (13)
    4. September (14)
    5. August (12)
    6. July (13)
    7. June (14)
    8. May (12)
    9. April (3)
    10. March (9)
    11. February (6)
    12. January (8)
  4. 2014 (174)
  5. 2013 (32)
  6. 2012 (1)