Decrease in Sense of Smell Seemingly Indicative of Being at a Higher Risk for Dementia

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

According to new research, it is being seen that seniors are more likely to develop dementia, if they fail at a smelling aptitude test. Failure to properly name at least four out of five common odors, peppermint, fish, orange, rose and leather, was shown to have a correlation with rates of dementia development in these individuals. This long-term study, conducted by the University of Chicago, told 2,906 participants between the ages of 57 and 85, to determine and label a variety of everyday smells. The testing of smells was carried out through the use of, what the study called, “Sniffin’Sticks”. These sticks are felt-tip pens that are filled with certain scents instead of the default ink. It was concluded at the end of the study that 78 percent of the people involved had a regular sense of smell, being able to identify at least four out of the five scents presented to them. Only one percent of the participants could not name any of the scents. During a follow-up five years later, it was discovered that nearly all the participants that could not identify any scent had developed dementia.

SOURCE: CTV News, October 2nd, 2017

AUTHOR: Relaxnews 

DATE RETRIEVED: October 11th, 2017


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