Is It Time to Drop the Amyloid Hypothesis?

Monday, May 28, 2018

After another early drug trial has failed, Dr. Donald Weaver from Toronto’s Krembil Research Institute, is feeling rather frustrated. This compound was being tested to prevent the clumping of tau which creates he distinctive tangles that develop in the brain of people with Alzheimer’s disease.  With so many drug trails failing many researchers are second guessing the leading theory behind the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Among many, the accepted cause of Alzheimer’s disease is the amyloid hypothesis which states improper folding of the amyloid protein creates plaques within the brain. The amyloid hypothesis was first proposed in 1992, and since then majority of Alzheimer research has been focused on finding drugs that clear amyloid plaques from the brain or slow the production of amyloid plaques. Some researchers argue that the reason why the drugs are not successful is that they are given too late, and the damage is too advanced. Paul Murphy, from the University of Kentucky states, “the field is clearly in need of innovative ideas. It is possible that everything has been sort of built on a shaky foundation all along, and we won't know that for a few years”. As researchers continue to delve into the many unknowns surrounding Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, it will be important to explore new avenues.
SOURCE: CBC News: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/alzheimer-s-disease-amyloid-hypothesis-drug-failure-1.4675212
DATE RETRIEVED: May 24, 2018

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