Researcher Focuses on Prevention Rather than Treatment: A Drug Trial

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

With dementia, there are molecular processes and changes in the brain that occur years before symptoms are noticeable. Researchers at the University of Virginia are looking into how dementia develops at the molecular level before neuronal damage and symptoms are present. Specifically, researchers are investigating whether memantine, a medication commonly used in alleviating symptoms of moderate dementia, could slow or prevent progression of dementia if used before symptoms appear. George Bloom shares his outlook on treating dementia, “Based on what we’ve learned so far, it is my opinion that we will never be able to cure Alzheimer’s disease by treating patients once they become symptomatic,” showing the importance of early identification. Bloom suggests we must determine who is at risk of developing dementia, and begin to treat them with medication and lifestyle interventions long before symptoms are apparent. This approach focuses on prevention rather than treatment. The use of memantine will help prevent neuronal cell death that occurs when affected neurons attempt to divide. This abnormal attempt to divide is due to the bodies attempt to compensate and counteract the disease process, however, this is unsuccessful and leads to higher cell death. Memantine acts to block this process, stopping the cells from reentering the cell cycle. Bloom is currently working with his team of researchers to design a clinical trial to further investigate the possibility of using memantine for early intervention.
SOURCE: Lab Manager: http://www.labmanager.com/news/2018/08/study-alzheimer-s-drug-may-stop-disease-if-used-before-symptoms-develop#.W2ml_dVKi70
DATE RETRIVED: August 7, 2018

  1. 2018 (125)
    1. October (9)
    2. September (12)
    3. August (16)
    4. July (12)
    5. June (12)
    6. May (11)
    7. April (17)
    8. March (12)
    9. February (15)
    10. January (9)
  2. 2017 (141)
    1. December (9)
    2. November (13)
    3. October (13)
    4. September (13)
    5. August (6)
    6. July (15)
    7. June (12)
    8. May (15)
    9. April (12)
    10. March (12)
    11. February (12)
    12. January (9)
  3. 2016 (137)
    1. December (6)
    2. November (10)
    3. October (15)
    4. September (16)
    5. August (12)
    6. July (9)
    7. June (6)
    8. May (15)
    9. April (12)
    10. March (18)
    11. February (9)
    12. January (9)
  4. 2015 (122)
  5. 2014 (174)
  6. 2013 (32)
  7. 2012 (1)