News archive - September 2019

Thursday, September 12, 2019

What multilingual nuns can tell us about dementia

A strong ability in languages may help reduce the risk of developing dementia, says a new University of Waterloo study.

The research, led by Suzanne Tyas, a public health professor at Waterloo, examined the health outcomes of 325 Roman Catholic nuns who were members of the Sisters of Notre Dame in the United States. The data was drawn from a larger, internationally recognized study examining the Sisters, known as the Nun Study. 

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Expert advisory: Federal election

The University of Waterloo has experts available for interviews on a wide range of election-related issues.

For experts or issues not on this list, please see our media relations contact information below.


ECONOMY, INNOVATION AND JOBS

Kathleen Rybczynski
Labour economics; health economics; economics 

Thursday, September 5, 2019

New research alerts governments to problem with groundwater monitoring

Bad wells tend to get excluded from studies on groundwater levels, a problem that could skew results everywhere monitoring is used to decide government policies and spending.

Researchers at the University of Waterloo uncovered the problem while examining a discrepancy between scientific data and anecdotal evidence in southern India.

Reports on thousands of wells and satellite images taken between 1996 and 2016 suggested groundwater levels were rising, good news in an area where it is vitally important for agriculture.

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

New mathematical model can improve radiation therapy of brain tumours

Researchers have developed a new model to optimize radiation therapy and significantly increase the number of tumour cells killed during treatment.

The new mathematical model, outlined in a recent study led by a University of Waterloo student, can use information about where the majority of the cells in a tumour are located allowing for radiation treatment to be administered to the densest area. 

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

Narcissists: Think you're strong critical thinkers? Think again

Narcissists are less likely to use critical thinking processes that are important for solving problems and making sound decisions, new research from the University of Waterloo shows.

The researchers found that while many narcissists may perceive themselves as highly intelligent, critical thinkers, they are less likely to use important reflective thinking strategies when solving problems, Therefore, the high levels of confidence they have in their intellectual abilities are often misplaced.

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