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Friday, July 21, 2017

Frost-protection for crops wins cold cash at Velocity Fund Finals

A biotechnology company that created a spray that helps farmers and growers protect crops from frost damage was among the big winners at the Velocity Fund Finals held today at the University of Waterloo. Velocity is a comprehensive entrepreneurship program at Waterloo.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Destruction of small wetlands directly linked to algal blooms in Great Lakes

Canada’s current wetland protection efforts have overlooked how the environment naturally protects fresh-water resources from agricultural fertilizer contaminants, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found.

In a recent study, researchers at Waterloo’s Faculty of Science and Faculty of Engineering found that small wetlands have a more significant role to play than larger ones in preventing excess nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizer from reaching waterbodies such as the Great Lakes.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Waterloo Innovation Summit hosts forward-thinking conversations on disruptive trends

Some of the world’s foremost thinkers on disruptive technologies will gather at the University of Waterloo this September to discuss Canada’s role in the world’s next economy.

Joining Canadian business, government and academic leaders at this year’s Waterloo Innovation Summit will be influential speakers from some of the world’s most cutting-edge companies and innovative schools of thought.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

New chair, vice-chair for UWaterloo Board of Governors

The University of Waterloo has appointed a respected financial executive and Waterloo alumnus as chair of its Board of Governors, and a leader in the field of wireless technology as vice-chair.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Conserving wetlands could save Canadians millions in flood damage

Leaving wetlands in their natural state could reduce the financial costs of flooding by nearly 40 per cent, according to a report from the University of Waterloo.

Researchers at UWaterloo’s Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation, found that avoiding wetland loss could lead to substantial savings for Canadian communities that experience flooding.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Ensuring carpoolers are compatible is key to ridesharing success

Ensuring that would-be carpoolers are riding with people they actually like could potentially decrease car use by nearly 60 per cent, research from a professor at the University of Waterloo has found.

The research, recently published in Transportation Research Part C, used social media analytics, algorithms and computer simulation to match would-be carpoolers with people driving to work.

Friday, June 30, 2017

Super-sensitive measurement method could advance medical research, environmental monitoring

A new method for measuring extremely tiny objects could lead to cheaper, more accurate sensors for use in fields including medical research and gas detection.

Research at the University of Waterloo found that nanoscale devices using electromagnetism would be sensitive enough to determine the mass of viruses a hundred billion times lighter than a strand of human hair.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

UWaterloo and Ciena research drives advancements in Internet connectivity

UWaterloo and Ciena research drives advancements in Internet connectivity

Engineering researchers at the University of Waterloo are working with Ciena to find solutions to help network operators and Internet providers respond to the insatiable demand for faster and faster data transmission over the Internet.

Monday, June 26, 2017

Gays and Lesbians Who Feel Supported are More Certain about Retirement Prospects

Gay men and Lesbians who don’t feel socially supported feel less secure about their retirement then heterosexual adults, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.

The study of working Canadians aged 45 to 70 found the majority of them believed that retirement by age 62 was achievable. While the number held true for gay men and lesbians who felt socially supported, it dropped by a year more for those that felt isolated or marginalized.

Friday, June 23, 2017

Putting others first can cost lives in emergencies

Selfless heroism isn’t the best strategy in life-and-death disaster situations involving groups of people, a new study from the University of Waterloo suggests.

The study, which used computer modeling of a flooded subway station, found overall survival rates were substantially higher when strong people in a 30-member group reached safety themselves before trying to help weaker people.

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