Thursday, November 21, 2019

Sky's the limit: Autonomous airline service among winners of Concept pitch competition

A company aiming to create the world’s first fully autonomous airline service is among the four winners of the Concept $5K Finals.

Ribbit, a venture led by University of Waterloo student Jeremy Wang (PhD Mechanical Engineering, 2022) and Carl Pigeon (MASc Aerospace Engineering, University of Toronto 2016) will receive $5,000 grants for their pitch, which centres around incorporating software and sensor retrofits for the charter air market.

Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Reservoir management could help prevent toxic algal blooms in Great Lakes

Managing reservoirs for water quality, not just flood control, could be part of the solution to the growth of toxic algal blooms in the Great Lakes, especially Lake Erie, every summer.

In a major study involving data from Canada and the United States, researchers at the University of Waterloo identified reservoirs on streams and rivers as sources of food for algae at the worst possible time.

Monday, November 18, 2019

Researchers bring gaming to autonomous vehicles

Researchers have designed multiplayer games occupants of autonomous vehicles can play with other players in nearby self-driving cars. 

Friday, November 15, 2019

Waterloo medical startup wins first Entrepreneurship World Cup

A medical technology startup co-founded by two Waterloo Engineering students topped more than 100,000 applicants to take first place and the $500,000 prize in an international competition staged in Saudi Arabia.

NERv Technology, which is based out of the Velocity Garage in downtown Kitchener, won the Entrepreneurship World Cup (EWC) following a startup boot camp and several rounds of competition in Riyadh.

Monday, November 11, 2019

Scientists develop sensor to save children, pets left in vehicles

A small, inexpensive sensor could save lives by triggering an alarm when children or pets are left alone in vehicles.

The new device, developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, combines radar technology with artificial intelligence (AI) to detect unattended children or animals with 100-per-cent accuracy.

Monday, November 4, 2019

Scientists create 'artificial leaf' that turns carbon dioxide into fuel

Scientists have created an “artificial leaf” to fight climate change by inexpensively converting harmful carbon dioxide (CO2) into a useful alternative fuel.

The new technology, outlined in a paper published today in the journal Nature Energy, was inspired by the way plants use energy from sunlight to turn carbon dioxide into food.

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Report outlines measures to protect commercial real estate owners against floods

The Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation is aiming to give Canada’s commercial real estate a safe harbour ahead of a growing storm.

The University of Waterloo research centre has developed a comprehensive report outlining 20 measures that can be implemented by commercial real estate owners and managers to enhance flood resilience.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

New way to wrap liquid drops could improve drug delivery

Researchers have developed a faster, cheaper way to coat liquid medication, an invention that could improve how drugs are delivered in the body.

The new encapsulation technology, developed by engineers at the University of Waterloo, uses gravity and other natural forces to wrap drops as they fall through a thin layer of liquid shell floating on a base liquid.

Once hardened, or cured, by exposure to ultraviolet light, the shell houses and protects the liquid core inside.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

New way to wrap liquid drops could improve drug delivery

Researchers have developed a faster, cheaper way to coat liquid medication, an invention that could improve how drugs are delivered in the body.

The new encapsulation technology, developed by engineers at the University of Waterloo, uses gravity and other natural forces to wrap drops as they fall through a thin layer of liquid shell floating on a base liquid.

Once hardened, or cured, by exposure to ultraviolet light, the shell houses and protects the liquid core inside.

Monday, October 21, 2019

Rising emissions are turning arctic permafrost into a carbon source, research shows

Arctic regions have captured and stored carbon for tens of thousands of years, but a new study shows winter carbon emissions from the Arctic may now be putting more carbon into the atmosphere than is taken up by plants each year. 

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