Corneal, Conjunctival effects and blood flow changes related to silicone hydrogel lens wear and their correlations with end of day comfort

TitleCorneal, Conjunctival effects and blood flow changes related to silicone hydrogel lens wear and their correlations with end of day comfort
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsSorbara, L., J. Maram, T. Simpson, and N. Hutchings
JournalContact Lens and Anterior Eye
Volume41
Pagination193-200
Keywordsadult, Article, balafilcon A, blood flow, blood flow velocity, bulbar conjunctival blood velocity, comparative study, Conjunctiva, conjunctival hyperemia, Contact lens discomfort, contact lens dryness, Contact lenses, controlled study, cornea epithelium, Corneal, corneal epithelial thickness, Corneal Topography, cytology, Epithelium, female, galyfilcon A, High modulus, human, human experiment, Humans, hydrogel, Hydrogels, Hydrophilic, hydrophilic contact lens, keratometry, Lens fitting factors, Low modulus, male, normal human, physiology, priority journal, Prosthesis Fitting, prosthetic fitting, Regional Blood Flow, silicone derivative, Silicones, vascularization, visual analog scale, visual system parameters
Abstract

{Purpose: First, to examine how wearing high and low modulus lenses with two different base curves affected lens fit, and the corneal tissue and bulbar conjunctival vascular tissue (bulbar redness and blood velocity). Secondly, to quantify the associations between these baseline and outcome variables and the third purpose was to correlate these variables with end of day comfort. Methods: Thirty participants wore higher (PureVision (PV) 8.3, 8.6) and lower (Acuvue Advance (AA) 8.3, 8.7) modulus silicone hydrogel lenses for two weeks on a daily wear basis. Lens fitting characteristics were examined. Corneal epithelial thickness was measured and the cornea and conjunctiva were assessed. RBC velocity was estimated from high magnification bulbar conjunctival images. Subjective comfort/dryness was reported by participants using visual analogue scales. Results: AA lenses were rated the most comfortable (ANOVA

DOI10.1016/j.clae.2017.12.010