Vision screening at two years does not reduce the prevalence of reduced vision at four and a half years of age

TitleVision screening at two years does not reduce the prevalence of reduced vision at four and a half years of age
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsGoodman, L., A. Chakraborty, N. Paudel, T. - Y. Yu, R. Jacobs, J. Harding, B. Thompson, and N. Anstice
JournalClinical and Experimental Optometry
Volume101
Pagination527-534
Keywordschild, children’s vision, eye refraction, female, follow up, Follow-Up Studies, human, Humans, hypoglycemia, Low, low vision, male, Ocular, pathophysiology, physical examination, physiology, Preschool, preschool child, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, prospective study, reduced vision, Refraction, sensitivity and specificity, statistics and numerical data, Vision, vision screening, vision test, Visual acuity, visual impairment, visually impaired person, Visually Impaired Persons
Abstract

{Background: There is currently insufficient evidence to recommend vision screening for children < 36 months of age. This study assessed the effect of comprehensive vision screening, as well as the sensitivity of age-appropriate vision tests, at two years of age on habitual visual acuity at 4.5 years of age. Methods: Children born at risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia (n = 477) underwent vision assessment at 54 ± 2 months of age including measurement of monocular and binocular habitual visual acuity, assessment of binocularity and stereopsis. Of these children, 355 (74.4 per cent) had also received vision screening at two years of age (mean age = 24± 1 months), while 122 were not screened. Results: Eighty (16.8 per cent) children were classified as having reduced vision at 4.5 years of age, but the prevalence of reduced vision did not differ between children who had previously been screened at two years of age and those who had not (15.5 per cent versus 20.5 per cent

DOI10.1111/cxo.12645