CANCELLED - Philosophy Colloquium Series 2019-2020Export this event to calendar

Friday, March 27, 2020 — 3:30 PM EDT

Microphone clip art with a pale pink and green backgroundJoin us for a talk by Andrea Sullivan-Clarke, from 3:30-5:00 pm in HH 1102, March 27th. 

"Relations and How Decolonial Allies Acknowledge Land"

Abstract:
Described as a first step toward reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada, land acknowledgement statements are a recent trend in the United States. The motivations for creating these statements are varied, while these motivations may differ, the adoption and creation of land acknowledgement statements by non-Indigenous entities seem to originate from a locus of social awareness. As such, it is plausible to describe land acknowledgement statements as a performative utterance or speech act as put forth by J. L. Austin (1975).  Performative utterances, however, can misfire. I contend that the inconsistency between the motivations and the actual practice of land acknowledgment statements is worrisome, and the intended state of affairs may not obtain. Thus, potential allies must attend to these worries, not only as they impact the practice of land acknowledgement statements, but they must consider these concerns if they are to be decolonial allies to Indigenous people.  


Dr. Sullivan-Clarke will also be giving a Public Talk at Shatitsirótha’ Waterloo Indigenous Student Centre, at St. Paul's University Colleg, March 26th at 2:00pm.

A Way of Being in the World: Native American/First Nations Philosophy

Abstract: 
In keeping with the calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Final Report (2015), many universities across Canada are looking to “Indigenize” their curriculum. What does that mean for the humanities? In Philosophy, it not only means increasing representation (in the classroom and on the syllabus), but it also encourages the development of courses on Indigenous Philosophy. In this presentation, I introduce a general sketch of Native American/First Nations Philosophy by connecting Indigenous traditional oral narratives and thought with the three branches of the traditional Western canon—metaphysics, epistemology, and axiology. Through these connections, it will become apparent that Native American/First Nations Philosophy offers a different way of being in the world.

Location 
HH - J.G. Hagey Hall of the Humanities
1102
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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