Understanding memristors: using physics, materials science and information theory to engineer a new class of non-volatile storageExport this event to calendar

Thursday, January 26, 2012 — 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM EST

Physics colloquium

Speaker: 
Gilberto Ribeiro
Speaker's department: 
Senior Scientist
Speaker's Institute: 
Hewlett Packard Labs

The demand for data storage in the world grows faster than Moore’s law. New applications, cloud computing and many other examples show that nowadays we are directed to a data centric computing paradigm as opposed to our conventionally understood processing. This upcoming demand is not going to slow down, and in fact, the amount of power utilized in server farms has grown from 2% of the US power expenditures to 5-6%, in just about 4 years. This tremendous increase only points in the direction that not only we are in desperate need of storage solution, we also need to find a low power alternative that does not include moving parts. Several emerging technologies are being currently investigated, not only to replace hard disks which is on course by existing FLASH, but also with the ultimate goal of creating a so-called universal memory, permeating through different portions of the computing hierarchy.

Here I will be presenting the progress done at HP Labs in memristor technology, covering basic aspects from a materials science standpoint, to device performance and implementation of CMOS compatible circuits. Speed, endurance, energy and statistical description of the switching process will be covered, in addition to a materials survey and characterization with modern synchrotron techniques.

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