Teacher profiles

Niayesh Afshordi

Niayesh Afshordi

Associate Professor

Dr. Afshordi dabbles in Astrophysics, Cosmology, and Physics of gravity and is obsessed with observational hints that could help address problems in fundamental physics.

Michael Balogh

Michael Balogh

Professor; Associate Chair

Professor Balogh's research uses the world’s largest telescopes to study the physical properties of distant galaxies.  Through spectroscopy we can learn about the distances, ages, chemical composition and star formation histories of these galaxies. 

Kostadinka Bizheva

Kostadinka Bizheva

Associate Professor

​Dr. Bizheva's research focuses on the development of novel optical imaging technology (Optical Coherence Tomography - OCT) that can be used in clinics to image various part of the human body for diagnostic purposes or for monitoring the outcome of drug therapy or surgery.

Avery Broderick

Avery Broderick

Associate Professor

​Dr. Broderick works to explain the fundamental physics of black holes and their observable characteristics. Black holes are sites where strong gravity dominates everything, from the dynamics of orbiting material to the shape of spacetime itself.  As a result, they are the engines that power some of the brightest objects in the universe. 

Raffi Budakian

Raffi Budakian

Professor; Joint WIN/IQC Nanotechnology Endowed Chair in Superconductivity

​Professor Budakian's work in the past decade has focused on developing the experimental tools for ultra sensitive detection of electron and nuclear spins. He explores the application of these tools to address fundamental questions ranging from biology to quantum information.

Anton Burkov

Anton Burkov

Associate Professor; Associate Graduate Officer

Dr. Burkov is a theoretical condensed matter physicist, currently focusing on the effects of nontrivial electronic structure topology and electron-electron interactions on experimentally observable properties of quantum materials.

Melanie Campbell

Melanie Campbell

Professor; Director, GWPI

Dr. Campbell leads a highly multidisciplinary research group where they study ocular development, eye disease, and linear and non-linear optics of the eye. They investigate the fundamental refractive properties of the eye's components to improve diagnosis and therapy for various ocular conditions.

Jeff Chen

Jeff Z.Y. Chen

Professor

Soft matter is a cross disciplinary research field involving physics, chemistry, biology, and materials science. It studies physical systems that can be deformed relatively easily in response to external and internal physical and chemical conditions.

Kyung Soo Choi

Kyung Soo Choi

Assistant Professor

​Dr. Choi's research focuses on the development and application of the most advanced techniques in cold atom physics and quantum optics to probe the fundamental nature of the quantum world and to investigate macroscopic quantum phenomena with strongly interacting atoms and photons near nanoscale structures.

Mike Fich

Michel Fich

Professor

Dr. Fich is an astronomer specializing in studies of star formation, the interstellar medium, and the structure of galaxies. His recent research activities have focused on “small scale” formation studies of low and intermediate mass stars, circumstellar disks, and the formation of proto-solar systems.

James Forrest

James Forrest

Professor; University Research Chair

Dr. Forrest's research is focused on the behaviour of soft materials at the nanoscale. This includes self assembly of polymers, dynamics in thin films and near surface and interfaces. He has a long standing interest on the dynamics of glassy materials.

Michel Gingras

Michel Gingras

Professor and Canada Research Chair in Condensed Matter Physics & Statistical Mechanics

Professor Gingras’ main interests are in the field of theoretical condensed matter physics, with a focus on systems with random disorder. He is also interested in strongly correlated classical and quantum condensed matter systems subject to strongly competing, or frustrated, interactions.

Bae-Yeun Ha

Bae-Yeun Ha

Professor; Undergraduate Advisor - Life Physics

In Professor Ha's research group, they explore a few theoretical problems in soft matter and biophysics, namely, chromosomes in living cells and lipid bilayer membranes.

David Hawthorn

David Hawthorn

Associate Professor

The Quantum Materials Spectroscopy group, led by Dr. Hawthorn, studies Quantum Materials using resonant soft x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy at synchrotrons such as the Canadian Light Source. We use these tools to investigate intertwinned order in Quantum Materials and shed light on the long-standing mysteries of high temperature superconductors.

Rob Hill

Robert Hill

Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, Faculty of Science; Undergraduate Advisor - MNS

Dr. Hill's research is focussed on the experimental study of materials whose exotic properties are dominated by the collective quantum mechanical nature of their electrons and defy explanation using current theoretical paradigms.

Michael Hudson

Michael Hudson

Professor; Undergraduate Advisor - Astronomy

Broadly speaking, Professor Hudson's research is in observational and theoretical cosmology, particularly Galaxy Formation, and measuring the properties of dark matter and dark energy through Gravitational Lensing, Cosmic Flows and Large-scale Structure.

Stefan Idziak

Stefan Idziak

Associate Professor; Associate Dean of Science, Computing and Co-operative Education; Undergraduate Advisor

Contact information
Office: PHY 250
Phone: 519 888-4567 ext. 35580
Email: idziak@uwaterloo.ca

Thomas Jennewein

Associate Professor

Dr. Jennewein's main research passion is how to achieve quantum communications and a Quantum Internet on a global scale. In particular he is currently pursuing the use of satellites to accomplish intercontinental distances, and is possible with today’s technology.

Jan Kycia

Jan Kycia

Professor

On sabbatical until August 31, 2017

Dr. Kycia's group works on the experimental investigation of superconducting and quantum mechanical devices; in particular Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs), GaAs quantum dots (Spin Qubits).

Zoya Leonenko

Zoya Leonenko

Professor

Dr. Leonenko leads a nanoscale biophysics research group which uses advanced scanning probe microscopy methods to study biophysics of lipids and lipid-protein interactions, interactions of nanoparticles with lipid membrane and monolayers, and to develop novel application of lipid films in biomedical nanotechnology and biosensing.

Qing-Bin Lu

Qing-Bin Lu

Professor; University Research Chair

Professor Lu’s research programs cross disciplines in physics, chemistry, environment, climate, biology and medicine, particularly focusing on femtomedicine and cancer therapy, as well as the sciences of atmospheric ozone depletion (the ozone hole) and global climate change (“global warming”). 

Adrian Lupascu

Adrian Lupascu

Associate Professor

Dr. Lupascu is an experimental physicist interested in the quantum dynamics of various types of physical systems and the application of quantum effects to build new types of detectors and quantum information processors. His Superconducting Quantum Device lab focuses on experimental research with superconducting devices, ranging from quantum bits for quantum information experiments, to superconducting resonators for loss characterization, among other projects.

Norbert Lütkenhaus

Norbert Lütkenhaus

Professor

On sabbatical until December 31, 2017

Professor Lütkenhaus' research group explores the interface between quantum communication theory and quantum optical implementations. They translate between abstract protocols (described by qubits) and physical implementations (described for example by laser pulses); they benchmark implementations to properly characterize quantum advantage and exploit quantum mechanical structures for use in quantum communication.

Robert Mann

Robert Mann

Professor

Professor Mann works on gravitation, quantum physics, and the overlap between these two subjects. He is interested in questions that provide us with information about the foundations of physics, particularly those that could be tested by experiment.  

Matteo Mariantoni

Matteo Mariantoni

Assistant Professor

​Dr. Mariantoni has a strong background in cutting-edge research on superconducting qubits and circuit quantum electrodynamics. He specializes in the experimental realization of low-level microwave detection schemes and pulsing techniques that allow for the measurement of ultra-low quantum signals generated by superconducting qubits coupled to on-chip resonators.

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