Photonics and Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics profiles

Kostadinka Bizheva

Kostadinka Bizheva

Professor

​Dr. Bizheva's research focuses on the development of novel optical imaging technology (Optical Coherence Tomography - OCT) that can be used in clinics to image various part of the human body for diagnostic purposes or for monitoring the outcome of drug therapy or surgery.

Melanie Campbell

Melanie Campbell

Professor

Dr. Campbell leads a highly multidisciplinary research group where they study ocular development, eye disease, and linear and non-linear optics of the eye. They investigate the fundamental refractive properties of the eye's components to improve diagnosis and therapy for various ocular conditions.

Kyung Soo Choi

Kyung Soo Choi

Assistant Professor

​Dr. Choi's research focuses on the development and application of the most advanced techniques in cold atom physics and quantum optics to probe the fundamental nature of the quantum world and to investigate macroscopic quantum phenomena with strongly interacting atoms and photons near nanoscale structures.

Rajibul Islam

K. Rajibul Islam

Assistant Professor

Dr. Rajibul Islam's research interests are in quantum information processing, in particular quantum simulation and computation. His research team is building a quantum simulator with laser-cooled trapped ions to simulate models of interacting quantum many-particle systems. Dr. Islam is also involved in building 'QuantumIon', a multi-user, open-access trapped-ion quantum computer at Waterloo.

Thomas Jennewein

Thomas Jennewein

Associate Professor

Dr. Jennewein's main research passion is how to achieve quantum communications and a Quantum Internet on a global scale. In particular he is currently pursuing the use of satellites to accomplish intercontinental distances, and is possible with today’s technology.

Norbert Lütkenhaus

Norbert Lütkenhaus

Professor

Professor Lütkenhaus' research group explores the interface between quantum communication theory and quantum optical implementations. They translate between abstract protocols (described by qubits) and physical implementations (described for example by laser pulses); they benchmark implementations to properly characterize quantum advantage and exploit quantum mechanical structures for use in quantum communication.

James Martin

James Martin

Associate Professor

Dr. Martin studies basic atomic, molecular and optical physics. His group is constructing a laser cooling and trapping apparatus suitable for investigating a wide variety of phenomena associated with cold Rydberg atoms.

Christine Muschik

Christine Muschik

Assistant Professor

​Dr. Muschik is an expert in the theory of quantum communication and quantum simulation. Quantum communication exploits the features of quantum mechanical systems for advantages in communication tasks, such as unbreakable security or significant reductions in the resources required to send a message.

Joseph Sanderson

Joseph Sanderson

Associate Professor

Dr. Sanderson's research and that of his students focuses on the study of how matter interacts with intense Femtosecond laser pulses.

One of the ways which the interaction of matter with femtosecond laser pulses can be utilised is as a means of imaging some of the smallest fastest moving and most complex units of matter, molecules.

Dr. Crystal Senko

Crystal Senko

Assistant Professor

​Dr. Senko’s research focuses on using trapped ions for quantum simulations and quantum computing applications. Her work also explores qudits and how to improve the efficiency of encoding a logical unit of information using the multiple levels of a qudit.

Donna Strickland

Donna Strickland

Professor

Donna Strickland is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Waterloo and is one of the recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 for developing chirped pulse amplification with Gérard Mourou, her PhD supervisor at the time. They published this Nobel-winning research in 1985 when Strickland was a PhD student at the University of Rochester in New York state. Together they paved the way toward the most intense laser pulses ever created. The research has several applications today in industry and medicine — including the cutting of a patient’s cornea in laser eye surgery, and the machining of small glass parts for use in cell phones.

Dr. David Yevick

David Yevick

Professor

​Professor Yevick' s research group delivers practical, innovative and leading-edge solutions to industry while developing general physical and mathematical results and techniques that can be employed in wide areas of applied physics.