Jeff Chen

Jeff Z.Y. Chen

Professor; University Research Chair

Soft matter is a cross disciplinary research field involving physics, chemistry, biology, and materials science. Dr. Chen uses basic tools such as statistical physics, field theory, neural networks, and computer simulations to study structural formation in polymers and liquid crystals.

James Forrest

James Forrest

Professor

Dr. Forrest's research is focused on the behaviour of soft materials at the nanoscale. This includes self assembly of polymers, dynamics in thin films and near surface and interfaces. He has a long standing interest on the dynamics of glassy materials.

Bae-Yeun Ha

Bae-Yeun Ha

Professor; Undergraduate Advisor - Life Physics

In Professor Ha's research group, they explore a few theoretical problems in soft matter and biophysics, namely, chromosomes in living cells and lipid bilayer membranes.

Stefan Idziak

Stefan Idziak

Associate Professor; Associate Dean of Science, Computing and Co-operative Education; Undergraduate Advisor

Contact information
Office: PHY 250
Phone: 519 888-4567 ext. 35580
Email: idziak@uwaterloo.ca

Mark Matsen

Professor; University Research Chair

​Dr. Matsen's research focuses on theory and simulations involving the self-assembly of nanostructured polymers, such as block copolymers, liquid-crystalline polymers, polyelectrolytes and polymeric brushes. While he continues to build on his reputation for self-consistent field theory (SCFT), Professor Matsen is currently developing the next generation of theoretical techniques, specifically field-theoretic simulations (FTS).

Russell Thompson

Russell Thompson

Associate Professor

Dr. Thompson's research explores block copolymer behaviour using self-consistent field theory (SCFT), one of the best theoretical tools available in soft condensed matter physics. The structures of nanocomposite materials are examined, and nanoscale filler particles are added to the polymer matrix to create hybrid materials. The mechanical properties of both nanocomposite and pure block copolymer systems are also being predicted using the SCFT approach.