Quantum Computing profiles

Raffi Budakian

Raffi Budakian

Professor; Joint WIN/IQC Nanotechnology Endowed Chair in Superconductivity

​Professor Budakian's work in the past decade has focused on developing the experimental tools for ultra sensitive detection of electron and nuclear spins. He explores the application of these tools to address fundamental questions ranging from biology to quantum information.

Kyung Soo Choi

Kyung Soo Choi

Assistant Professor

​Dr. Choi's research focuses on the development and application of the most advanced techniques in cold atom physics and quantum optics to probe the fundamental nature of the quantum world and to investigate macroscopic quantum phenomena with strongly interacting atoms and photons near nanoscale structures.

Dr. K. Rajibul Islam

K. Rajibul Islam

Assistant Professor

​Simulating interacting quantum many-body systems on a conventional computer is hard, and often practically impossible. Because, the laws of quantum mechanics are not inbuilt in the workings of a (classical) computer.

Thomas Jennewein

Thomas Jennewein

Associate Professor

Dr. Jennewein's main research passion is how to achieve quantum communications and a Quantum Internet on a global scale. In particular he is currently pursuing the use of satellites to accomplish intercontinental distances, and is possible with today’s technology.

Jan Kycia

Jan Kycia

Professor; Undergraduate Advisor - MNS

Dr. Kycia's group works on the experimental investigation of superconducting and quantum mechanical devices; in particular Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs), GaAs quantum dots (Spin Qubits).

Raymond Laflamme

Raymond Laflamme

Professor; Canada Research Chair in Quantum Computing; Executive Director of IQC

Would using quantum mechanics for information processing be an impediment or could it be an advantage? This is the fundamental question in the field of quantum information processing (QIP). QIP is a young field with an incredible potential impact reaching from the way we understand fundamental physics to technological applications. 

Adrian Lupascu

Adrian Lupascu

Associate Professor

Dr. Lupascu is an experimental physicist interested in the quantum dynamics of various types of physical systems and the application of quantum effects to build new types of detectors and quantum information processors. His Superconducting Quantum Device lab focuses on experimental research with superconducting devices, ranging from quantum bits for quantum information experiments, to superconducting resonators for loss characterization, among other projects.

Norbert Lütkenhaus

Norbert Lütkenhaus

Professor

On sabbatical until December 31, 2017

Professor Lütkenhaus' research group explores the interface between quantum communication theory and quantum optical implementations. They translate between abstract protocols (described by qubits) and physical implementations (described for example by laser pulses); they benchmark implementations to properly characterize quantum advantage and exploit quantum mechanical structures for use in quantum communication.

Robert Mann

Robert Mann

Professor

Professor Mann works on gravitation, quantum physics, and the overlap between these two subjects. He is interested in questions that provide us with information about the foundations of physics, particularly those that could be tested by experiment.  

Matteo Mariantoni

Matteo Mariantoni

Assistant Professor

​Dr. Mariantoni has a strong background in cutting-edge research on superconducting qubits and circuit quantum electrodynamics. He specializes in the experimental realization of low-level microwave detection schemes and pulsing techniques that allow for the measurement of ultra-low quantum signals generated by superconducting qubits coupled to on-chip resonators.

James Martin

James Martin

Associate Professor

Office: PHY 357

Phone: (519) 888-4567 ext. 33201

Email: jddmarti@uwaterloo.ca 

Roger Melko

Roger Melko

Associate Professor; Canada Research Chair in Computational Many-Body Physics

Dr. Melko's research interests involve strongly-correlated many-body systems, with a focus on emergent phenomena, ground state phases, phase transitions, quantum criticality, and entanglement. He emphasizes computational methods as a theoretical technique, in particular the development of state-of-the-art algorithms for the study of strongly-interacting systems.

Dmitry Pushin

Dmitry Pushin

Assistant Professor

​Dmitry Pushin uses his broad background to apply quantum information processing methods to improve neutron interferometry, with the goal of making it accessible to the general scientific community as a resource for studying fundamental questions of physics, dark energy, phase transitions in condensed matter, magnetic materials in functional devices and materials science.

Kevin Resch

Kevin Resch

Professor; Canada Research Chair in Optical Quantum Technologies

Dr. Resch uses experimental quantum physics to understand photon entanglement and quantum information science. His work focuses on generating new quantum states of light with applications ranging from quantum computing to future medical imaging.

Dr. Crystal Senko

Crystal Senko

Assistant Professor

​Dr. Senko’s research focuses on using trapped ions for quantum simulations and quantum computing applications. Her work also explores qudits and how to improve the efficiency of encoding a logical unit of information using the multiple levels of a qudit.